Ragrolling


  #1  
Old 11-01-01, 12:00 PM
yvonne2
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Hi,

Could anyone please give me some advise on how to ragroll,what does it involve exactly, I'm a complete novice & dont have a clue.

Someone suggested I try it in my bathroom but, failed to explain how to go about it.

Thanx.

 
  #2  
Old 11-05-01, 02:10 AM
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I favor subtractive approach...

First apply the base coat and let it dry. Then apply the top coat (I use a glaze but any paint will work). Before it dries I ragroll it to remove some of the top coat. I use a chamois.

Others prefer to do an additive approach - ie, apply the topcoat with the rag instead of removing it.

The big boxes have many kinds of roller sleeves available to make it easier to do. The sleeve style affects the final look.
 
  #3  
Old 11-05-01, 04:28 AM
yvonne2
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Hi BobF,

Thanks for your advise, very much appreciated.
Could you tell me, is it easier to put the glaze on & then roll it off or, is it easier to dip the rag & then apply.

Would appreciate your advise. (Again)

Many Thanks.
 
  #4  
Old 11-06-01, 01:03 AM
B
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I like to remove glaze with the rag..

I haven't done that many to really say. Doing it by hand, I like to put the glaze on and then remove it by ragrolling. However, you have to work on small areas and work quickly.

One of my sisters-in-law uses the ragroller sleeves and finds it easier to apply the glaze with the rag.

Perhaps someone that has done both will chime in.
 
  #5  
Old 11-06-01, 02:26 AM
yvonne2
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Hi BobF,

Thanks very much for that advise, I think I'll be daring & have a go, I wont know if I dont try.

Thanks.
 
  #6  
Old 11-07-01, 12:57 AM
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don't be afraid of it

Don't be afraid to try. It will turn out just fine. At worst, you will just need to repaint. More than likely, you will be the envy of the neighborhood.

A neighbor did his family room using an old, dried up 4" brush. He trimmed a couple inches off the tips and used it in various sweeeping angles to remove the glaze. It looked like expensive wallpaper when he got done.
 
  #7  
Old 11-07-01, 02:24 AM
yvonne2
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Talking I can but try


Hi BobF,


I can but try,
Like you say, at worst I'll just have to paint over it, I hope I'll be as lucky as your friend.

I like doing things myself and seeing good end results but, if it all goes pear shaped I wont worry.

I'll let you know but, I'm not planning to do it until just before xmas, as I still have quite a bit of preparation left to do.

I'll keep you posted.
Thankx.
 
  #8  
Old 11-07-01, 03:29 AM
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Be sure to use an semi sheen paint for your base coat..
Also,find out in advance the "open time" for your scumble glaze(thats the amount of time that the glaze is still workable) If your glaze is oilbased then a little linseed oil mixed with it keeps the mixture alive for longer..
Personally,I prefer to brush the gaze on and then ragroll..the effect is more consistent. You can still ragroll different colours randomly over the first colour if you wish.
I usually scrunch the rag up into a wrinkled ball and roll it around in a random rolling motion until the whole wall is covered.
The biggest problem that people have is when they apply the tinted glaze to a large wall only half way ,ragroll up to that point and then start on the second half which may leave an overlapping mark from top to bottom caused by the glaze drying out too quickly..Disaster!!
This can be overcome by a helper..He/she paints on the glaze,just in front of you ,who is rag rolling behind him/her.
To protect your finish,you can if you wish, coat the walls with a satin,glossy or even matt glaze..Hope this will be of some help to you..
This section on my site covers scumble glazes...
http://www.aceoftrades.homestead.com/sponging.html
 
  #9  
Old 11-07-01, 04:15 AM
yvonne2
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Wink Great Advise

Hi toptosher,

That's some advise, Extremely helpful.

I did visit the link at the bottom of your message, great site, very informative.

Is it possible for one person to be able to do this successfully, without coming unstuck, so to speak.

When I attempt this, (Soon) should I dab the rag or literally roll it, I'm a little apprehensive I dont mind saying.
I wish I could wave a magic wand & get the same result as that on your site, (Wonderful).

Thanks a bunch for great advise. (Greatly appreciated).
 
  #10  
Old 11-07-01, 11:22 AM
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Yeah..It is possible to do this alone but you must be aware of how long the glaze will stay wet for!! That way you will know how far to glaze the walls before you start to rag roll. Try to glaze only 2 feet from ceiling to base board,ragroll and then glaze another 2 feet and so on...
Use a dry rag and wring out when it gets to full of glaze in (white spirits if the glaze is oil based or water if it is acrylic based)..
Hope you get what I mean!!
Practice first on a piece of plywood and dont worry,have fun learning...and learn from your mistakes!!
 
  #11  
Old 11-07-01, 11:45 AM
yvonne2
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I guess I'll just go ahead & try then.

Thanks for your advise.
 
 

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