Paint over Lacquer or Polyurethane?

Reply

  #1  
Old 12-10-01, 08:05 AM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Question Paint over Lacquer or Polyurethane?

I have an old dresser from when I was little (about 30 years old) and I want to give it a new look for my daughter. I know nothing about refinishing and I want to avoid stripping it if i can (because I am lazy ) - it appears to have some kind of shiny application over white paint - I am assuming that it is Lacquer or Polyurethane. Is there anything that can be applied over this that would maintain a new paint job?? Or is there no if, and, or butt that I have to strip it?? Please ask if you have questions, if this did not make sense - I am looking for a solution in order to have a finished product within about 2-4 weeks....

THANK YOU ALL WHO RESPOND!!!
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 12-10-01, 10:05 AM
fewalt's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: sw VA
Posts: 3,100
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
kthatch,
Your dresser can certainly be painted over without stripping.
It will need a light sanding over all areas to be painted, 200 to 400 grit paper will be fine. This will give the new paint something to hold on to. The 'priming' debate will probably surface here, but if you use a quality paint it will hold to your lightly sanded piece without priming.
good luck,
fred
 
  #3  
Old 12-10-01, 10:22 AM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thank You! Other Suggestions still welcome!

Thank you for your quick reply and advice! Since I am so very inexperienced in this matter, I am open to many other suggestions and ideas - others, please feel free to post more suggestions!

THANK YOU!
 
  #4  
Old 12-10-01, 02:37 PM
mikejmerritt
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
No Debate Concerning Primer

Use one! First choice for brushing....Parks Primer Sealer. Alcohol(shellac) based primer that bonds to whatever is there and provides a bonding surface for what follows which can be paint of your choice. The reason for this is if a piece is finished in lacquer or more recently conversion varnish bonding problems can occur if regular enamel, oil or latex, are used. Do sand as fewalt suggests and sand again after priming, tack rag and paint. A second choice to Parks would be KILZ Original, Zinsser shellac based primer or any good oil primer/undercoater. All mentioned are alcohol or oil based. If you want to avoid shellacs/oils Zinsser 123 would work. If you use shellac based get denatured alcohol for tool cleanup.....Mike
 
  #5  
Old 12-10-01, 03:03 PM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Seems to be very good advice! So, let me get this straight... 1.) Sand 2.) Prime 3.) Sand Again 4.) Paint... And what do you recommend to apply over the final painted product to get back that glossy, protective shine? (I am getting very excited for my upcoming project!) And, do you recommend a certain type of paint? I will be using bright, bold colors for the "new" dresser, with stesils of flowers and polka dots.
 
  #6  
Old 12-10-01, 03:04 PM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
and one more question...

what is tack rag?
 
  #7  
Old 12-10-01, 04:00 PM
fewalt's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: sw VA
Posts: 3,100
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
If Mike says to use a primer, then by all means go ahead.
Your final coat, if a gloss is desired, should be a quality latex enamel or oil based finish.
A tack rag is basically cheesecloth impregnated with a resin which will pick up all remaining dust for a cleaner smoother finish after sanding. They come in a 4x4 inch cello-wrapping and are about a buck each. You can actully make your own with cheesecloth and drops of varnish or poly.
fred
 
  #8  
Old 12-11-01, 01:38 AM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Pros and Cons of Primer

I like a job to be as simple a possible... so, can you tell me the pros and cons of primer - why some say use it and others say no need? Then I can make an educated decision for the "life" of my "new" dresser...
 
  #9  
Old 12-11-01, 02:03 AM
fewalt's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: sw VA
Posts: 3,100
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
kthatch,
A primer is used for two basic reasons: 1) to keep the resins in woods such as pine from bleeding through and ruining the surface finish - since your dresser is already sealed, see next.
2) to give the final coat something to adhere to which will be much less likely to chip or peel off.
Since your piece will be for a child's dresser, the primer is suggested for a good bonding finish. It will be subject to the normal dings and bumps from other objects in a child's repertoire.

fred
 
  #10  
Old 12-11-01, 02:11 AM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
THANK YOU BOTH, FRED & MIKE!

Primer it is! Thank you both for your advice! You have been very helpful! Now on to my exciting project... Merry Christmas!
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: