sanding and priming


  #1  
Old 01-30-02, 01:35 PM
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sanding and priming

Hello,
A couple of years ago, I stripped all the wallpaper in my bedroom, which, of course left alot of glue. I tried sanding it down by hand (what a job and time-consuming). Well, I thought I did a fine job and was quite proud of myself, so I painted as planned. Well, it would appear that I didn't do quite the good job I thought. The walls, in many spots, have that scaley/blistery/alligator look. I have bitten the bullet and bought a power sander. I just finished three days of sanding, inhaling dust, and enduring very sore arms. I've constantly run my hand down the walls to make certain it feels smooth, which it does. However, visually, you can see where the sanding ends and the unsanded paint begins, even though it feels smooth. I tried to transition the sanding into the areas not requiring any rework. My question, after all this explaining, should I put a coat of primer on before painting? If I don't, will all the various marks show through the paint? Would 2 coats of paint serve the same purpose? If I need a primer, which one would be the best? I read another post that said there was no magic/thick primer.....darn it!! I plan to begin the painting process this weekend, so any advice would be appreciated as soon as possible. Thanks.
 
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Old 01-31-02, 05:53 AM
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Is what you are seeing the difference between the sanded and unsanded areas? Or is it where the sanding has taken a layer of paint off and you are seeing the edge of the paint? What grit sandpaper are you using?

To answer your question about priming, since there is wallpaper paste in the layers and you did all this sanding, site-unseen I will recomend you to prime the walls, just to be on the safe side. Which primer? Hmmm, did the existing paint seperate, crack, peel or allow stains or color to bleed through? Was it a texture or roughness of the wall problem or was it a problem with the paint itself? An oil based primer such as Kilz would also be a safe bet, site-unseen.
 
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Old 01-31-02, 02:37 PM
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Thanks for responding. Well now, how to answer........I only sanded the parts of the wall that had the crackly/alligator/chipping. Where the paint looked smooth and was not peeling off, I left it alone. So the area where the sanding stops and the painted wall comes together (the edge of the paint) is where I have my concern. I used 60 grit sandpaper (the higher number didn't seem to cut through, so my hubby bought the 60) and in many areas got down to the white wallboard. Even though it feels smooth, you can see the two different textures/layers (wallboard vs. paint). However, I bit the bullet today and went shopping for my paint and decided to go ahead and buy primer to be on the safe side. In order to get the color I wanted, I bought the Behr paint at Home Depot, even though I read in one of the messages on this board that it may not be the best. However, the previous paint I used seemed fine and I bought it at K-Mart. I don't think the paint was the problem, but rather the fact that I painted over old glue and it didn't adhere properly. Anyway, I also bought the Behr primer/sealer today and hope that it will do okay. I do have one more question, though.......do I need to prime the entire wall or just the areas that have been sanded? Something tells me, though, that it should be the entire wall.
 
  #4  
Old 01-31-02, 04:41 PM
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You will need to prime just the areas that have been sanded, not the part that is still in good condition, assuming that it is latex going over latex.

60 grit, yes that is quite course, you may want to run over it with some 100 or 150 prior to priming, just so you don't see the sanding marks, and also to try to feather out the paint edge by hand, if it doesn't feather it well enough then skimming the edge of the paint with a thin layer of drywall compound may be in order, sanding smooth, then priming, assuming that these are slick finish walls (no texture)

Another tip, you can put one coat of paint only on the primed areas, let dry then re-paint the entire wall, it will help the coverage and it will put on the recomended two coats of paint over the primed areas.
 
  #5  
Old 02-01-02, 02:23 AM
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Thank you! I'm crossing my fingers now. However, the thought of more sanding.......aarrgghh!!! Oh well, we gotta do what we gotta do. Thanks again.
 
 

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