Spraying vs. brushing/rolling exterior shingles


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Old 02-05-02, 05:55 AM
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Spraying vs. brushing/rolling exterior shingles

We're down to the nitty gritty on this. Our insurance company absolutely insists we paint this bloody house (cracks in the ceiling, holes in the walls, literally a ton of trash in the attic, 60 amp fuse box with aluminum wiring, exterior steps with no handrails and they want it painted?) It's got to be done by the middle of March at the latest. My husband (I've let him handle this one ) has scraped what he could of the 20 year old paint from the 50 year old cedar shingle siding. The trim has been painted (sort of), loose shingles have been tacked back up and the dozen worst ones replaced.

We're considering spraying this monster to get it done in a reasonable amount of time (1800 sf one story ranch on a crawlspace) but everything I've read from pros and others shows a very negative opinion of spraying in general. Prep work, overspray, excessive paint use all seem to outweigh any advantages of time-saving realized by using the spray gun in the first place.

The only other thing I could think of was to use a roller and then go back with a brush to get the "cracks" between the shingles. That would be at least somewhat faster than using just the brush. At least I think so.

I would be very interested to hear others' opinions of this or anecdotal accounts of how someone else handled the "shingle" problem. We had been planning on siding the thing (eventually) but since I abhor wasted effort/money we'll now probably live with the painted shingles 'til we sell it a couple of years down the line.
 
  #2  
Old 02-08-02, 06:00 AM
mikejmerritt
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Just my thoughts....

Hello diylady, Good questions! A person has to know when to spray and when not to. I think when you hear that spraying is not advised if you just want to save time it refers to what you mentioned. If you factor cover up, clean up you may not save time but some things need to be sprayed. I think you have a candidate for spraying but only you can make that decision. Not only can you save time it may be the only way to get a good job if you don't have the speed a pro painter does with a brush. What I mean here is if the shingles are very dried out, its hot outside, no humidity and perhaps the sun is beating down on you a big mess can be made brushing and rolling such as shingles. All of these things can also make it take more paint by hand than spraying. When you hear paint waste mentioned concerning spraying it is almost always lattice, fencing or something paint blows right by. I would rather spend my time taping windows, covering concrete etc. than endless hours punching a brush into siding shingles. If you decide to give spraying a go get back and we can get a little deeper into that and get you a good job in a reasonable amount of time....Mike
 
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Old 02-11-02, 06:08 AM
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Thanks, Mike. You told me what I wanted to hear . I was not looking forward to brushing this beast. We will be using "Behr Premium Plus One Coat" and renting a nice heavy duty sprayer that we located at Nations Rents at Lowe's. We bought a gallon of this stuff in the color we thought we wanted and I painted one wall of the garage (concrete block) and a few shingles to see if it actually does cover in one coat. We had our doubts as we're trying to cover a really horrendous green. Think toy soldier green and you'll know what I'm talking about . It really did cover it in one coat! Although not quite the color we wanted. We thought the clerk may have, label on the top of the can notwithstanding, mixed the wrong color, as it was much lighter than we want (a gray.) Comparison with the chip on the sampler showed that it was, indeed, "Dear John" gray (ecctth. What an awful name.) Just goes to show, you can't really tell from a chip, what an 8x20' wall is going to look like. I'm going to get a gallon of "Gray Hawk" (much better!) in the "one coat" and paint over the lighter to see how we like that. We're going to try to do it this coming long weekend, weather permitting.

We're trying to guesstimate how much paint this is going to take. It's approximately 2500 sq. ft. (about 250 linear feet of wall with an average of 10' in heighth, including the foundation) Nothing subtracted for doors, windows, etc. One gallon, brushed and rolled covered about 175 square feet of masonry. My calculations say close to 15 gallons of paint using those figures. Whoof! Hope I'm off. We'll probably get 10 gallons and go from there. Hopefully it'll go further than what it took to cover the block, as that stuff, despite being painted at one time, really sucked it up. And of course, the doors and windows subtracts a bit.

A question: Will the paint be likely to drip from being sprayed? On 3/4 of the house it's no problem as the foundation is being painted the same color anyway; I can simply brush out any drips. However, on the front of the house the foundation has been covered with a manufactured stone that already has green paint dripped on it from the last time it was sprayed. I don't want to compound the problem (I have yet to find a way to get the stuff off. I think I'm going to have to sandblast it ) My husband plans on using a paint shield around doors, windows and trim (I suspect that yours truly is going to be holding the shield. Perhaps I should get a "bunny suit" like they use in clean rooms )

Any help appreciated, as always. I'll post a link to "before and after" pix when we're finished with it.
 
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Old 02-11-02, 06:12 AM
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Try to see if they can mix it in 5 gal containers. Should be cheaper.
 
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Old 02-11-02, 06:50 AM
mikejmerritt
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If you get paint dripping from the house you have something wrong. You would be putting to much on at a time or have the paint to thick or to thin. Remember two thin coats as you go is better than a heavy coat that may sag as you move around the corner. Get the paint thinned just right, practice a little sort of sneaking up on the amount of paint that you apply to get a good job. Even small sprayers can throw out enormous amounts of paint in a very short period and you sure don't want it to thick.....Mike
 
 

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