Oil paint over latex paint

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  #1  
Old 02-18-02, 08:50 PM
lakeway
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Oil paint over latex paint

We hired a painting contractor to repaint many of the rooms in the house. We had oil paint on the baseboards, and the painters painted over them with latex paint. We told them about their mistake, and they repainted over the latex with oil paint. Are we going to have a problem with the paint peeling in the future? This is an insurance claim, and we have not settled yet.

Also, they got oil paint all over the brass door handles. Does DeSolvIt or Goop Off remove the shine from the brass?

They also got oil and latex paint all over the ceramic floors. Will DeSolvIt or Goop Off work on both oil and latex paint?

Thanks for your help!
 
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  #2  
Old 02-24-02, 01:46 PM
darren608
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yes painters were at fault latex is cheap paint for new plaster walls_it lets them breathe_paint is only as good as the coat below
 
  #3  
Old 02-27-02, 02:00 AM
gregory001
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I,m afraid this is a problem with a lot of lazy painters.If you had an oil based gloss on the skirtings boards and they painted them with acrylic(Problem)without a proper undercoat(Rarely done)then painted again with oil based gloss.You will not see any problems until you knock the skirtings while you are sweeping/vacumning the floors.If you are worried about this,try and scratch the finish with your sharp fingernail or use the cut the paint and sticky tape method,and if it comes away back to the origional gloss,you have a problem.They will have to strip the skirtings back and start again.

"Sorry Boys I like to see it done properly first time"
 
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Old 02-27-02, 08:20 AM
T
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Im not 100% sure what the correct usage of latex based paints are, because we do not use them on this side of the pond...Mike,JDX..Can you enlighten us??
As far as fast drying acrylic primer undercoat is concerned..I have never had a problem with it..Ever!!
As long as the gloss gets a good tickle with a med. sandpaper,Acrylic primer undercoat provides an excellent base..
The best exterior undercoat in the U.K right now is Dulux weathershield which is waterbased and completley out performs its oilbased competition..
 

Last edited by toptosher; 02-27-02 at 08:35 AM.
  #5  
Old 02-27-02, 12:27 PM
gregory001
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I am familiar with dulux weathershield,it is an exterior acrylic,"very good quality",has a minor glue problem,wrecks your brushs,overpriced,over-rated other than that a good long lasting 100% acrylic.The question is ?will it stick to gloss enamel successfully.Yes is the answer,Prepared right,only the problem is This thread was refering to an interior?
Now lets just say you had the paint name wrong,100% acrylic primers can be sucessful on dulled gloss surfaces,but I am quite sure that the painters refered to in this thread have just continued the wall colour to the skirting while cutting in and did not bother to undercoat the gloss(Very Common)
 
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Old 02-27-02, 01:46 PM
T
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but I am quite sure that the painters refered to in this thread have just continued the wall colour to the skirting while cutting in and did not bother to undercoat the gloss(Very Common)
If the painter just toshed in the woodwork with wallcolour then of course...thats lazyness and can only be described as a bodge up...However...Ive read posts here where latex paint have been used on exterior and interior woodwork..My point is do they have latex paints that are meant for this use?? Im not sure...but Im sure we will find out..
 
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Old 02-27-02, 08:30 PM
mikejmerritt
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Well, this thread sort of jumps around a bit and I'm not sure where its coming from or going but heres the scoop on the catch all term enamel in the states and why there is a huge problem here. EPA. Enviromental Protection Agency. This country used oil based paints forever for woodwork and walls alike. Well, in the 70's a push for safer paints was on and all paint makers had to find a way to produce waterbased paints for use on everything. For the most part latex paints for walls is great because the better grades do well on oiled walls with a good sanding or priming. The latex enamel is where the trouble starts. It works well for wood trim for the most part, though its not as tough as oil and doesn't self level. It also doesn't bond in any way to oil paints. When latex must be used for wood trim over oil a primer of some sort must be used, though, a good sanding will provide some degree of bonding, you can't count on it. We have some fine 100% acrylic primers rated for interior and exterior use. They bond to anything and all materials will bond to it. We can still get oil primers but if I wanted to use oil I would just use oil for the finish. I prefer the latex primers unless using as a stain blocker. One coat of latex primer and a few finish coats, whether over oil or latex, and your good. Put latex paint straight over oil and you've got big trouble. As gregory001 points out it stays until the painter is paid and every time its touched the paint comes off. Lakeway has this situation and it will cause problems. The last coat of oil will not keep the latex under it from causing problems. Gregory001 is correct in his cure for this and that is the oil topcoat and the bum latex coat over oil MUST come off. Remember that huge problem I mentioned early in the post? If flooring is down you can see it could be a very painful process.
The way we have to do things over here is hard to keep up with even for me. The word enamel is used for almost all paints except flat wall paint and that includes latex, oil and waterbourne (oops wrong country...you guys have me mixed up now...) waterborne enamels leading to great confusion by home owners and so called painters who are out for a quick buck or who just don't know better. We have exceptions to exceptions to our exceptions when it comes to what to use where and on what. I suppose you would just have to be here......Mike
 
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