staining Cedar siding


  #1  
Old 03-25-02, 11:29 AM
newhandyman
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Question staining Cedar siding

I am not sure if this is the correct forum for this question but here it goes.

I am looking for a good quality stain for my Cedar siding. I want to find a redwood colored stain with a warranty of at least ten years, if it exists. I went to Home Depot like pretty much everyone does sooner or later and they only carry a stain that will gaurentee for 5 years. Any suggestions or experiences would be appreciated.


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  #2  
Old 03-27-02, 04:27 PM
KeithP
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The siding is on the ONE thing you'll have spent the most money on in your life. Buy quality friend. Are you doing it yourself? Buy from a reputable paint dealer, not a 'Box Store'. Warranties mean nothing even if some company 'guarantess it to your specifications' if it STILL fails. It has to be fixed, re-done. Time, mess and money. The sides that take the brunt of the weather/UV will wear the fastest. Inevitable. Period. 10 years? Why not 11? Or 9? See my point? Preparation is key, and it is essential, especially on cedar. Opaque stains (solid colors) will look rustic and show the roughness still of the wood, but no grain, peel and/or flake sooner if the prep was poor. If new bare cedar, a quality oil-based (preferrably linseed oil-based) primer would be recommended to hold back color and possible tannin-bleed). Transparent stains will involve less color but not peel nearly as much. They penetrate. The best product I have ever used and seen follow-up results on, is "Raincoat" by Para Paints...(not one complaint in 15 years) not the OTHER 'raincoat' you may have seen. It will NOT peel or lift, resists UV for about 5 years and is so easy to recoat compared to any alternative. UV products will have a golden cast to them and that is their nature. They deepen the tone of the wwod, as if it were wetted by rain for example. If you like that, use Raincoat. Do not use silicone-based products such as Thompsons as they will peel, and cannot be easily and properly recoated without stripping due to the silicone they chuck in their product. Raincoat can be tinted. You may also choose solid stains that appear more like paint, in an unlimited palette of hues. Is this clear cedar, with few knots? If so, good. If not, beware of tannin bleeding. Always a potential concern. I'll wait for your reply before going further on this topic .
 
  #3  
Old 03-28-02, 06:37 AM
newhandyman
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Cool Staining Cedar Siding

Keith -
thanks for your insight on this! Here's my scenario. I just purchased this home at the end of Febuary. I have a brother and a cousin who are nice enough to help me replace some of the Cedar siding boards on my house, I had a couple bad areas from woodpeckers. I think by correcting those problem areas and restaining the entire house, I will avoid them in the future. Anyway that is another topic all together.

So yes, I will be doing this project myself with a little professional FREE help (my brother is a carpenter). I reallly like the idea of using this Raincoat product you have mentioned. The areas of my house which are out of the "elements" do have a darker "wet" look. I really like it. So, I have already replced some baords that had varmit holes in them and in May I plan on replacing the boards which have too many knots missing from them, more than 2 or 3. It sounds like on the new boards I will need to seal them to prep them properly before I stain the entire house. Mt cousin who will be helping is well versed with a power washer and he would be that "stain man". Yes, I was going to spray the stain instead of roll it. I do know that I need a nicely cleaned and dry exterior before I stain. Do I need to wash the entire house with a mild soap too and not just water? The Cedar that is existing already has a brown tinted stain to it and almost looks oily in the areas that do not get much sun. The wood is not oily to touch though.

Tanin bleeding is a brownish "leak" from the wood right? I read some technical writing on it and how the moisture behind the wood begins the process.

thanks for your input on this subject. It is reassuring because getting information from the "HOME" stores it not always the most reliable.

(by the way, Toronto Rocks! I'm a RUSH fan)

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  #4  
Old 03-28-02, 07:09 AM
KeithP
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You need to be careful if you power wash...it can damage the wood. Since there is old and new wood, perhaps some knots it would be to your advantage to a technical rep from a good paint company come take a look and spec the job. Exterior staining jobs can be troublesome and involve the majority of exterior complaints along with decks. They'll inspect your home for free and offer the best prep and products to do the job. Eyes on the project is always better than not seeing it. Raincoat is only one product, there are many out there. Ask a neighbour too, what did they use, their experiences and satisfaction. I'd personally choose the site inspection route. Let us know how it turns out.
 
 

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