Spray or Roll Textured Coating


  #1  
Old 04-21-02, 12:12 PM
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Question Spray or Roll Textured Coating

In the Western area of the USA and especially in my area along the coastline, stucco is a commonly used exterior finish. This finish coating can withstand the weather elements better than most other exterior building materials within it's cost range.

After several coatings of paint applied over many years, it becomes necessary to remove all the layers of existing paint to obtain a quality and longer lasting repainting job.

The method used to remove the existing old applied paint is by sand blasting all the layers off. After this proceedure is completed, restuccoing in a selected color or applying a sprayed on coating, in a selected color, can be completed.

If the choice was to apply a sprayed on coating after the sand blasting, years later it again becomes necessary to repaint. The question now becomes how to repaint over an existing sprayed on textured coating.

Opinions on how to accomplish this task vary widely. Some professional painters spray the new paint directly on the textured coating, while others will not. Those that will not spray claim repainting over a textured coating must be done with a roller only.

Both those that spray or roll will perform all the reqired prep work first and will apply an undercoating, if changing colors. If not changing colors, both claim appling two coats of the new color paint will cover correctly.

The question here is who is correct? Spray or Roll?

To further complicate matters, some painters will not repaint over any textured coating without lightly sandblasting first. The theory on this method is to insure the new paint will not be applied to any un-noticed loosened textured material.

The next question is which method is correct?
Sand blast entire surface first or just chip loosened areas, fill and repaint?

All professional opinions and suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Regards & Thanks
Tom_B
 
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Old 04-21-02, 01:34 PM
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Spray or roll paint on stucco

It's a judgment call when it comes to painting. Large jobs are typically sprayed. Smaller jobs can be easily rolled. As with any painting project, surface preparation is crucial to the success of the paint job. How the paint is applied is a matter of choice.

Some claim a rolled job is superior to a sprayed job because spraying may unevenly coat the surface and the coating may be too thin. Too, they claim the roller is more effective for getting paint into nooks and crannies and cracks on rough textured surfaces such as stucco, whereas sprayed paint just lies on the surface it hits. Heavy spraying will create drips and sags.

As you live in area with a lot of stucco homes it should not be difficult to get recommendations and references about the stucco painters and coating contractors there. The brush and roller method for painting will probably be more expensive than the sprayer method because of the amount of time and labor involved.

The new textured coating products available are typically sprayed over stucco. They claim to be very durable, require no maintenance except rinsing with a water hose if there is soil. And, there is no painting! These elastomeric products tend to be 100% acrylic resin. Custom colors are available. Should one desire to paint, one must wait a year and then only a water-based paint used. Go to www.dehavenconstruction.com for helpful info re: elastomeric coatings on stucco. Your favorite search engine should provide more info on maintenance free coatings for stucco.
 
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Old 04-22-02, 08:04 AM
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After sandblasting,you would I assume be left with a surface that is slightly pourous...Personaly I would either spray or roll on a thinned out masonary paint that would be largley soaked up...
As the surface is slightly absorbant,the first thin coat whether sprayed or rolled will seap at least 1/16" into the surface.
This in its self is the best way to seal walls without havin to worry about it cracking or flaking in the near future..Further coats textured/smooth should bond extremely well to the this type of prep..
After 6 or 7 years , some paints although not chipping flaking or cracking can be suseptible (spellcheck) to becoming "chalky"..The best way to prep this is to power wash the surface and then apply a coat of stabiliser before redecorating..
Flaking and cracking is usually due to paint being applied over an unstable surface.. Anything a powerwash cannot remove should be fine to repaint over although bare surface material should be primed as described above.
 

Last edited by toptosher; 04-22-02 at 08:34 AM.
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Old 04-28-02, 07:10 AM
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More Information Requested

Hello & Thanks Twelvepole and Toptosher for both your insightful and worthy suggestions & thoughts for consideration on the topic.

The topic is still open if any others care to reply. The choice has not yet been made. All additional information on the subject will be taken into consideration, appreciated and welcomed.

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All Forums Host & Moderator
Tom_B
 
  #5  
Old 04-30-02, 06:10 AM
mikejmerritt
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Hello Tom, you have received some sound advice at this forum and also it seems the pros you have talked to know what it takes to do a job you can be proud of and they can stand behind. As for rolling or spraying if the prices are close I would have it rolled. Unless your painter makes several passes (and he may) with the sprayer you will get more paint on the building rolling. If money is saved spraying get an assurance that the stucco will be covered completely, plenty of material applied and, one of the biggest things beyond the actual paint job, they don't spray every thing in site. Some stucco has such a texture that spraying is out of the question as pointed out by twelvepole. I assume the sandblasting is at an extra cost to you and if reasonable its a very good idea. If the blasting is expensive and the finish on the building is very tight with no problems good primers and paints will bond without it. Perhaps a good washing with TSP to clean and dull the surface would be a good middle ground at the prep stage. Tom keep in mind that I don't live or work in a coastal area :-( and these are just general thoughts. Good luck and get back with any more questions.
 
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Old 05-01-02, 07:49 PM
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Hi: Mike

Thanks for your reply also. The information you offered is well taken. Get your rollers ready, gas up the truck and start painting...your hired...LOL!

Another question came upduring the estimates regarding the paint application. The painters that want to spray, claim spraying two coats of the same new color, one coat each day, will complete the job.

No undercoat {primer} is needed they claim, since the existing color and the new color will be the same. All the prep work will be done first, of course.

The question now is, can two coats of the same selected finish color be spray applied over each other and accomplish a quality finished result? Reminder. The color old color and the new color will remain the same.

The painter that claims two sprayed on coats cannot coverwell, claims one coat rolled on will produce better results then 2 coats sprayed on.

Who is correct and why?

Thanks,
TomB
 
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Old 05-02-02, 04:20 AM
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Priming exterior coatings

Tom, to prime or not tends to be determined by the type and condition of the surface that is being painted as well as the type of paint being used. Does the exterior coating manufacturer recommend priming before repainting? What type of paint? Latex? Does the manufacturer of the paint require priming before painting? Is the surface rough? Primers tend to level out uneven surfaces and make for better adhesion. If a primer is required, does the paint manufacturer recommend two coats of paint over the primer for best performance? Some of the new paints are self-priming.

http://www.sherwin-williams.com/cont...duct-focus.asp
 
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Old 05-04-02, 06:41 AM
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Hi: twelvepole

Every painter thus far suggests using the Dunn-Edwards brand. Each claims the ACRI-FLAT 100% acrylic flat finish, applied in two coats without a primer will work fine.

According to the paint manufacture, no primer is required since the paint is "self-priming." The concern is the wording that states the paint is an "extremely flat" finish.

Using the generic commonly understood meaning of "extremely flat," when considering paint, I am wondering what type of durability factor this will provide in the climate conditions in this area along the coast.

Considering the moist climate zone, extreme temperature changes between days and nights and the baking sunlight during summer months of a desert region, a flat acrylic finish may not maintain it's new look very long.

This part of the country is rather unique. In one day a person can be at the beach in 80 degree weather and after driving two or three hours be sking in the snow during some winter months.

Even along the coastline, which is subjected to wide temperature swings in summer months. This part of the country is still a desert region even if it does not appear to be.

The sunlite in the southwest is also be very intense in the summer months. It can fade any painted surface. Which is the primary reason why a stucco or applied textured coating is available in a wide assortment of colors and is so very popular in this area.

Dunn-Edwards is the predominate major selling brand in this area. Other brands are available but one has to advise the painter which brand you prefer they use or you get Dunn-Edwards it seems.

The question now is, will the acri-flat 100% acrylic paint be the correct choice under these type of conditions?
 
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Old 05-04-02, 03:23 PM
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I would like to know why the painters suggest flat paint. If your paint choice is available in a satin I would have to go with that.....Mike
 
 

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