paint fumes smell


  #1  
Old 04-30-02, 05:17 AM
T
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Unhappy paint fumes smell

we moved into a new house in jan 2002. Last month, when the outside temps got into the 80s and 90s, we began to notice a musty smell in two of the rooms connected to a shared full bath. the smell disappears with the AC on. the plumber has been back and stated the plumbing is good. the bldr then resealed and painted one of the rooms and the bath, howeer, now there is a strong odor of paint fumes, and there is still a hint of the old smell. the paint used is duron flatt wall paint. I've heard a pigment in the paint can cause a bad smell. We are really confused...can anyone offer an opinion/advise please??

thanks
 
  #2  
Old 05-01-02, 04:30 AM
B
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musty smell

The musty smell is due to high humidity. Running the AC removes the excess humidity.

There seems to be little air flow. The facts you have mildew and that you still have the odor of the paint fumes suggest this.

Use the exhaust fan when bathing/showering. This will remove a lot of the humidity. No matter what the builder does, you will have mold/mildew if the humidity remains high.

As for the paint smell - you could be smelling whatever the builder used to clean the mildew. Its also possible (probable) that the painter put a strong mildewcide into the paint. And yes, some paints have a stronger odor than others. But the paint odor should disappear in a short time.

If the weather is nice, open the windows and run a fan. This will help.
 
  #3  
Old 05-01-02, 05:47 PM
KeithP
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To add to Bob's post...is there any noticeable mildew in this bathroom? Brown spots? Did the painter use alkyd? If so, the odour will subside. The 'additive' to the paint that increases the 'smell' is the colorant, or tint. It is loaded with VOC (volatile organic compounds), and hence the 'smell', even with the so-called 'low VOC paint'. The sealant used may also have an odour (kinda like vinegar). If it was latex, and an odour is still present, I'd be interested in hearing back from you.
 
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Old 05-02-02, 05:27 AM
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the repaint/resealing was done over a week ago...i'm not sure what type of sealing the paint contractor used, but am looking into it. should it take longer than a week to dry? the painter first applied the sealer, waited 1 hr for it to dry and then applied the paint. it was close to 80 deg outside yesterday and the fumes really smelled. There is no midew/ mold in the bathroom.. I;ve had the windows opened the whole week, so i don't think it is a circulation problem either- the roof above has a ridge vent and the soffits are clean. i've been up in the attic and it does not smell up there......we've noticed the smell comes directly from the flat wall paint....you can stick your nose right on certain walls and the stench is there!! The question is this: Since the room had a different smell prior to sealing, is it possible the resealing/repainting has masked the old smell (from bad paint, i imagine) and turned it into a worse smell??

thanks for everyone for your input/advise....
 
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Old 05-02-02, 09:46 AM
SixFe
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The smell

Tom

I did some remoldeling in my home which required replacing wallboard and repairing old nail pops, etc.... I did the work in the fall and winter. Come spring time when the temp increased (65-70) and windows were opened, this odor started to emerge. With the windows closed, and the AC on, I never got the smell, but if I opened the windows, and it was 70 degrees or more outside, the smell would come. Winter was not a problem.

I do not know if this totally fits your situation, but it took me over a year to figure out that it was bad joint compound. The stuff did not smell in the container, but where ever I used that joint compound, you could go up to the wall (wallboard seams, screw head locations, corners, etc...) and smell it stronger.

Anyways, I originally used a water based primer/sealer (easy cleanup) to seal the joint compound. I went back and used the BIN, alcohol based primer from Zinseer, and the smell was gone immediately.

I say it was bad joint compound, but who knows. The odor definitely came from the joint compound on the walls, and no where else. Use a good primer sealer on EVERY painted wall and ceiling surface, and I would bet your troubles will be gone.

Jeff
 
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Old 05-03-02, 09:12 AM
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Jeff:

The painter tells me the sealer used was alchol based and it dries very quickly. I met with the bldr, paint contractor, and reps from Duron this AM. The paint over the sealer was conventional water based latex paint - same as original. The Duron rep also said it may take over thirty days for the paint to "cure". Can you tell me how long the paint fumes odor lasted after you resealed with the alchol sealer? While it looks like the original smell is gone, I'm now puzzled by the strong odor resulting from the resealing a week ago. I'm hoping I just need to wait it out a bit. thanks, Tom.
 
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Old 05-03-02, 01:56 PM
SixFe
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Tom,

The Zinsser, BIN primer (alcohol based shellac) that I used dried very quickly also - about 45 minute drying time. I repainted the walls and ceilings in my living room and two bedrooms. The paint had a very strong odor, but, with a fan blowing out the window, the fumes dissipated in a couple hours. The next day, not only was the original odor gone, but the paint odor was almost gone. I repainted with water based latex, and within a few days there was no paint odor at all.

Paint dries rather quickly, but I have heard that it could take several weeks for certain paints to fully cure.

Jeff
 
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Old 05-06-02, 10:24 AM
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jeff:

i kindly appreciate your advise. At this point, i'm going to wait two weeks and then decide what to do. It may be a good idea to wait it out to see if the fumes disappear within the next two weeks or so.....

tom
 
 

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