bubbles in interior paint

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  #1  
Old 05-17-02, 06:56 AM
dhollohan
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bubbles in interior paint

We are applying Pittsbury Paint--Manor Hill--to be exact to the upstairs area of the house. The paint keeps bubbling off despite using a stain sealer that was recommended for the problem on these areas. Some spots have had 5 coats of the sealer and when the paint is put over it, it bubbles again. It sometimes doesn't bubble right away--it can take a number of hours before they show up. As to the reasons causing this, moisture has been sited most often. The house never seemed to be overly moist; there is no mold around at all. While persistance seems to have gotten most areas, we are afraid that the paint will bubble right off the walls later. Is there something we can do to prevent this from happening when we start to paint the downstairs?
 
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  #2  
Old 05-18-02, 02:18 PM
KeithP
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Are the walls plaster? If so, seal all the remaining walls with an alkyd (oil) primer to prevent the water in the paint from soaking in and reacting with the lime in the plaster. Then you may paint with latex. I'll watch for your reply in the meantime.

Keith
 
  #3  
Old 05-21-02, 05:20 AM
dhollohan
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Keith,

Yes, the walls are plaster. While we didn't prime all the walls with the oil stain sealer, everytime we encounter the bubbles, we scraped it off, applied the sealer, sanded and reapplied the paint. Would the stain sealer we were using be different from priming with a oil-based primer? Is there a difference between the fast drying and slow drying varieties of the stain sealer? We were using the quick drying.

In any case, we will certainly take your advise and prime the whole downstairs before we start.

Dawn
 
  #4  
Old 05-21-02, 12:32 PM
KeithP
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I'd let everything dry out real well...sand any remaining peeling areas, remove the dust, spot prime with a quality oil primer...leave overnight, then prime all surfaces once with the same top quality oil primer...leave 24 hours, then paint (one or two coats). Any primer that dries slowly is usually better than a fast-dry product but certain stain-killing primers are shellac-based and dry in a very short time. Use a normal 8 hour dry oil primer for this job if it's not a race. Take care,

Keith
 
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