Joint compound over wallpaper glue


  #1  
Old 05-30-02, 10:36 AM
Magi
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Joint compound over wallpaper glue

Does anyone reading here know if joint compound will adhere to a wall with wallpaper glue residue? I've contacted a couple of joint compound manufacturers, several paint distributors, and spent hours combing the web but haven't been able to get this question answered!
 
  #2  
Old 05-30-02, 07:25 PM
T
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Surface preparation for joint compound

Surface preparation for joint compound typically requires that surfaces be free of dust, dirt, grease, oil, powdery deposits, and any other potential surface contaminant. Wallpaper glue residue should be removed and surfaces lightly sanded to give them "tooth."
 
  #3  
Old 06-01-02, 12:01 PM
Sonnie Layne
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When it comes to texture compound (vs. joint compound), you've got to prime it first. One I've come across recently that seems to work in cases like yours is a Zinnser product called Guardz. Any primer would be better than none, however.

The adhesive, being water-based can cause problems with water based paints because the paint tends to soften/loosen the adhesive. So the adhesive isn't adhesive anymore if that makes any sense.

If not Gardz, then use a fast drying alkyd primer and then texture away. I've used shellac in the past, but for some reason folks are afraid of it, prob'ly not enough profit . At any rate, I think you'll find that for texture compounds, mfg's ask a surface be primed first, so not to worry after that!

my best,
Sonnie
 
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Old 06-01-02, 08:09 PM
Magi
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Thanks, Sonny. I'll try the Guardz if I can find it here in town. FYI, I've used B-I-N (shellac) in a similar situation and still had problems with subsequent layers of paint chipping and peeling.

I appreciate your reply as well, twelvepole, but there's lead based paint on the wall so sanding and scraping are out of the question.

Magi
 
  #5  
Old 06-01-02, 08:10 PM
W
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Magi,

You should ALWAYS remove all the old wallpaper adhesive prior to the application of anything other than additional wallpaper. Want a visual of what will happen if you apply a primer, which is designed to penetrate and seal, over wallpaper paste? Click me. If wallpaper paste will do that to primer, what will it do to your joint compound?? Water and a little elbow grease will take care of the paste and then you can safely do your repairs.
 
  #6  
Old 06-01-02, 11:04 PM
Magi
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Rebecca -

Thanks for the reply though sure didn't need the visual, as that's exactly what I'm looking at on the wall in question! Some idiot put a coat of latex right on top of a wall covered with old wallpaper adhesive. I scraped a lot of it off, then thought "Maybe I better check to see if any of these underlayers are lead-based" and, sure enough, they are. I then found a product by Zinsser called Peel-Stop that supposedly binds flaking paint to a wall to make it sturdy for a new coat of paint. Ha! The painted areas that had appeared somewhat sound then started to bubble and peel and I had to scrape that off. I considered simply using one of those textured, paintable papers to contain the whole wall, but worry that the areas that still have latex-over-glue won't remain stable under the paper. Any thoughts on that?

I guess my only other question now is, if I use a liquid wallpaper adhesive remover will I still have toxicity problems with the lead-based underlayers from the scrubbing?

Finally, I found a tip at another site that fabric softener is an effective wallpaper adhesive remover. Have you heard of or tried that?

Thanks - and I'm sorry to be such a pain!

Magi
 
  #7  
Old 06-02-02, 07:39 PM
W
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Don't waste your money on wallpaper strippers. Good old hot H2O will do as much, if not more than, any of them.

Fabric softener does work on adhesives. I have been known to use Downy liquid mixed with water a time or two, but most of the time just plain water will work. One of those green 3M scrubbing pads helps too. More instruction can be found on my site, but this is all you should need to know.

Your lead paint issue does raise questions. Most of these questions deal with legal and moral issues that are way too heady to discuss in this forum. Ensure there are no children around when you are doing anything around the lead paint. As long as you are using nothing that will allow particulate matter to become airborne (sanding), I think you will be fine. You can go to the EPA website (requires Adobe Acrobat) and read about lead paint if this is an issue for you.

Speaking for myself, if this was my problem, this is how I would handle it: I would attack the wall with a bladed wall scraper. This would be the rough, brute force attack. I would get as much of the bad area off as possible. Then I would commence the arial assault with a garden sprayer full of hot water. Lots of scrubbing between wettings. Wait 24-48 hours for the wall to dry. Now perform any patching with joint compound. Then put on one thick coat of Zinsser Gardz. Wait the proper drying time, and follow up with coat number two. This special, new, high-tech primer that will seal up everything tighter than a drum. Now your wall is ready for paint or wallpaper. I vote for some wallpaper, but I am biased!

I hope all turns out well, if you should need additional advice, feel free to ask!
 
  #8  
Old 06-08-08, 05:37 AM
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wallpaper paste removal

I found a mix of water/distilled vinegar 50/50, or stronger does a really good job on "vinyl wp adhesive". this was tough stuff. rinse well.
 
  #9  
Old 06-08-08, 06:09 PM
S
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Coating unremoved wallpaper glue is one of the things Gardz is designed for; it is not just an ordinary primer.

Now, before you topcoat, you will have to remove ALL the failing paint. You simply cannot go over the top of paint that is peeling or not adhering well; it simply does not work. The problem in your case is that lead-base undercoat. You have to make sure that it remains undisturbed on your wall... If the lead paint is peeling or chipping at all, it is time to consult your local health department, or you could run into BIG issues if you ever want to sell your house. (Lead remediation done in a way not approved in your jurisdiction is a big deal.)

If any of the drywall underneath is damaged, apply the Gardz before the joint compound. If you do not, the J/C will soak through to the Gypsum and swell. Sealing off drywall damage is another thing the Gardz was designed for.

SirWired
 
 

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