mitre cuts


  #1  
Old 12-27-99, 11:01 PM
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I am doing moldingsand I am not good with mitre cut - I have a hand saw and mitre box, My cust are always off!
 
  #2  
Old 12-28-99, 08:27 AM
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AL: A mitre box and a had saw just won't do it. The problem is that there are too many variables. The slots in the box have play in them, the saw may be substandard, and your
hand and arm may not always work in a straight line. If you are doing mitre cutting, I would suggest buying a mitre saw.
The are relatively inexpensive, and you can get a fairly good one for around $200.00. You can get the top of the line for $590.00
Good Luck, Jack the Contractor
 
  #3  
Old 12-30-99, 08:08 PM
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Check to make sure your door or window or whatevery you are putting molding around is square. This is a common mistake --- you may think your cuts are coming out at the wrong angle, and all along what you are trying to work with is the "wrong angle".

KW
 
  #4  
Old 12-30-99, 10:30 PM
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KW:
It does not make any difference of your window is square or not. You always cut molding to fit what ever you are putting it around. Jack the Contractor
 
  #5  
Old 01-26-00, 04:43 PM
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I am also working on putting crown molding in a bedroom, and was wondering if hardware stores will pre-cut it for you (if you give them the measurements)? Or do I need to invest in the mitre saw myself?
 
  #6  
Old 01-26-00, 09:50 PM
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Crown moulding is one of the more difficult types of moulding to install. The measurements are too specific and intricate to be cut off site and I have never heard of a lumberyard offering this. If it is only one room, I would suggest hiring a carpenter that has experience in installing crown moulding. It would be less expensive than getting a decent miter saw, and the finished project should be garaunteed. Although if you want to take on the project, more power to you. The best way to cut the crown moulding at the corners is to "cope" them. Even if you get a good mitre saw, mitered inside corners are nearly impossible to fit. Sorry if this sounds overwhelming, but I thought you might like to know what you are getting into. A narrow (2" wide or less) moulding would be much easier to install, but a standard width- about 3-1/2" wide is more common, and also considerably more difficult. Feel free to e-mail me if I have only confused you with this posting.
 
  #7  
Old 01-27-00, 03:37 AM
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Rosemary:
If you are going to install crown molding in your bedroom, make sure you get the crown molding corners also. Factories make corners, which make it very easy to install.
Then you just have straight cuts. Good Luck

------------------
Jack the Contractor
 
  #8  
Old 02-12-00, 07:48 PM
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don't forget the crown molding strecher- it comes in handy for the short cuts, speaking from experience. All kidding aside- if you add an additional piece of upside down base to the crown you get a real nice looking crown addition, this will also act as a stabilizing brace when installing the crown molding.
 
  #9  
Old 08-17-07, 08:26 AM
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just check this video out. It will help

http://www.xxxxx.com
 

Last edited by GregH; 08-17-07 at 05:52 PM. Reason: Remove link
  #10  
Old 08-19-07, 06:25 AM
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This is an 8 year old thread apparently resurrected by someone trying to sell something. Another reason for archiving.
 
 

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