Coat back of boards?

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  #1  
Old 06-12-03, 07:47 PM
Smokyie
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Coat back of boards?

Hi, I'm wondering if I should coat the backs of pine paneling for a kitchen. It is made by Georgia Pacific 5/16" thick, tongue & groove 8 ft plank type. I'm coating with polyurethane.

I've been told the wood needs to "breathe" and expand so don't coat the back and I've read that others coat the back of the boards to prevent a moisture problem.

Thank you for any advice on this.
 
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  #2  
Old 06-13-03, 05:13 AM
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Both statements are correct. But the actual application goes a long way in determining what to do and why.

Paneling will be fastened to the studs of the wall. This alone will help prevent cupping due to differences in the amount of moisture present on the two faces of the wood. The tongue and groove construction will keep the individual boards from moving independently of the the others, while allowing them room to expand and contract laterally.

Wood as thin as what you propose to use will transpire moisture quite readily, and likely won't be exposed to much extreme in the differences in moisture. The finish on the face will protect the wood from any extreme amount of moisture from the kitchen itself. Airflow between the interior of the room and the space behind the panels will provide some balance as the air could move between the boards in the space where the tongue and groove joint meets.

Having said all that, I would not bother to coat the back of the boards for interior use.

Hope this helps.
 
  #3  
Old 06-13-03, 06:21 AM
Smokyie
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Thank you, chfite - that really helped me to decide what to do - just one more quick question on this.
Would you suggest 2 or 3 coats for the front? They are looking nice with two coats but, of course, I know that three will make them smoother.
In terms of protecting the wood, would three coats of polyurethane be a good idea?
Thank you very much.
 
  #4  
Old 06-13-03, 09:15 AM
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I would start with a thinned coat 50% to serve as a sealer. It will dry fast and enable you to easily sand it smooth for the subsequent coats. I would go with two finish coats, sanding 180 grit between the first and second as with the sealant coat. Be sure to watch the timing for application and drying of the product as mentioned on the container.

Ordinarily, one 'lays on' polyurethane as with most varnishes. Two coats will be rather thick as it is. Why not step back and look at it once the second coat is dry and decide for yourself whether or not you want another thick coat?

Hope this helps.
 
  #5  
Old 06-13-03, 02:49 PM
Smokyie
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Thanks again, chfite
I'm going to do three thin coats, I think. It will take a little more time but it should look nicer.

This is a very helpful site and I appreciate getting the advice.
 
  #6  
Old 06-14-03, 02:23 PM
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Panelling

Don't forget to let the panels acclimate (adjust) for 3-4 days to temperature and humidity of the rooms in which you plan on installing. This will make for fewer expansion/contraction problems.
 
  #7  
Old 06-15-03, 09:39 PM
Smokyie
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Thank you - yes, I plan to bring them in to let the wood adjust to the room. It has been quite a project, but I should wrap it up in two more days. That will be eleven days spent working on these planks! Looks good so far.
Thanks for the reply.
 
  #8  
Old 06-15-03, 10:22 PM
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Paneling

Keep us posted on the progress of your project so that it will help others who are dealing with the same issues.

Best wishes!
 
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