Door Trim


  #1  
Old 03-07-04, 08:13 PM
blowrie
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Door Trim

I just replaced an old exterior door and know need to replace the trim around the door. The trim is 1X4. The door frame and the wall that the trim attaches to is not even, so my trim does not sit flat. There was no way to make it even. Any tips on how to put the trim up so that it at least looks even and looks good? I would perfer not to caulk in the gap.
 
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Old 03-08-04, 07:38 PM
C
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Is the jamb too wide or too narrow?
 
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Old 03-09-04, 02:07 PM
blowrie
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The width is fine. The 1X4 will attach to the jam on one side of the right side of the 1X4 and the wall on the left side of the 1X4. The the wall and the jam are at different levels causing the 1X4 to not attach flat.
 
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Old 03-09-04, 03:42 PM
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Lightbulb Mt Two Cents

Hello: b

I cannot invision the set up per description nor am I a pro in this area. However, shims are available at building supply yards and most likely building supply stores and or within building departments of the large chain retailers.

May be shims are what can help......???? Hope so.
I had similar problem with molding around garage door. Shims helped to solve that problem quick.

Thanks to the expertise advice obtained right here on DIY...
 
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Old 03-14-04, 11:23 PM
Furniture Bldr
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If the door frame is sitting into the room at a pretty consistant space all way down, you can dado out the back side of the molding over the jamb to account for it sticking into the room.

I assume that reinstalling the door isn't an option?
 
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Old 07-01-04, 02:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Furniture Bldr
If the door frame is sitting into the room at a pretty consistant space all way down, you can dado out the back side of the molding over the jamb to account for it sticking into the room.

I assume that reinstalling the door isn't an option?
.
Im in this situation as well... and reinstalling the door isnt an option...not now, anway - besides..my walls are not plumb, come to find out.

The 'dado' idea seems most viable, imo, ..if you're able to. There may only be a slight deviation in getting the molding to lay flat against the wall.
.
I encountered that when I just installed my new exterior door. Originally I ordered my door and asked NOT to have the brickmold attached so I could install the door from the inside out -rather than from the outside in...but they attached the brickmold anyway. So I had to remove the brickmold, and ended up 'dadoing' out 3/8"x1/2" so it would lay flat against the house's sheathing.
I installed the door with its frame even with the inside wall....as much as possible -to get the door as plumb as possible.. Well the 2 didnt meet. So my door frame doesnt lay even with the wall - all around. It isnt much, but will cause the inside door trim to not lay flat against the wall at some spots.
I figured that I'd dado out some of the trim as I did for the brickmold.
From what I can see, it would only be about 1/8th" at most on the bottom left corner.
That should do it.
.
Question..Maybe obvious, but, do you nail the trim to the door frame, or to the wall..(which would it the r.o. behind it)?
 

Last edited by jatco; 07-01-04 at 03:21 AM.
 

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