Welcome to the DoItYourself Forums!

To post questions, help other DIYers and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our DIY community. It's free!

installing floor molding in a room that is not level


honeyhoney's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

11-07-04, 08:54 PM   #1  
honeyhoney
installing floor molding in a room that is not level

Several things. I live in a house that is 110 years old. It is not level. Today, I ripped out the base moulding in the bedroom (hope I'm using the right terminology). No nails were in the left-corner section when I ripped off the moulding yet now there is a hole about 6 inches. Do I have to repair the plaster before I put in new moulding? I plan on using molding that would cover up the plaster. Also, since the floor is not level, how I do I measure for the moulding to make sure it it is installed properly and looks nice? Must get done within 10 days before the significant other comes home or I'll be in the dog house. Any advice would be very appreciated.

Thank you

 
Sponsored Links
Sawdustguy's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

11-07-04, 10:53 PM   #2  
Sawdustguy
If it's not an outside wall, I wouldn't worry about patching the plaster if the new base will cover it.

Well, in regard to doing the molding. If it's painted molding, you can always use calk where it doesn't meet 100%. If it's stained molding, You can cope it into one another. You'll have to cut the angle first and then cope it.

One last option is to scribe the base to the floor, but if the floor is really out, you'd see the difference in heights.

Personal preference at this point

 
chfite's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 9,483
SC

11-08-04, 02:53 PM   #3  
If the floor is carpeted, the carpet should hide the irregularities of the base when it is installed.

If the floor is not carpeted, the base would be installed and the quarter-round would be mated to the floor's contour so that it rides up onto the base and conceals any irregularity between the base and the floor. I would install the base straight and use the quarter-round to make up the irregularity with the actual floor. Quarter-round is quite flexible and will follow the irregularity of the floor easily.

Hope this helps.

 
Sawdustguy's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

11-09-04, 02:32 PM   #4  
Sawdustguy
Chifte,

My question for you is, if you install it flat, how were you planning on making the miters come together, especially if the floor pitches down at that point, if you're not going to scribe the molding? A quarter round won't help hide the fact that the miters won't come together. When the molding meets the corners, it needs to sit at the exact height in order for the miter to be clean.

 
chfite's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 9,483
SC

11-09-04, 08:54 PM   #5  
You have to work with what you have. It will depend upon how bad the floor is. If the base runs straight along the wall or level, as the case may be, it will meet as best it can in the corners.

I would start by choosing the best case installation for the worst part of the room and start from there. If the base is running up or down at the corner, cut it to make the miter. If the floor is bad enough, you will have to scribe it. It is hard to tell how bad the floor is from the question.

There may be a certain amount of finesse involved.

 
patches's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

11-28-04, 02:32 PM   #6  
patches
I'm also in the process of putting trim up with uneven floors. Does anyone have any advice on where I can learn more about how to cope and miter the corners??

 
Search this Thread