Welcome to the DoItYourself Forums!

To post questions, help other DIYers and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our DIY community. It's free!

crown molding on uneven ceiling???


hobbs_m's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 258
AL

11-08-04, 07:29 PM   #1  
crown molding on uneven ceiling???

wanting to put up crown molding...i think it is about 2.75 inches wide...

there is one section near my brick fireplace that is not straight or level...that part of the ceiling is about 1/2 inch lower...it is straight, and then it curves down and back up...it causes the crown molding to have a gap on each side of the curve...the gap about 1/4-1/2 inch...i am afraid it may be to big to caulk...

what are my options to help with the gaps???

also...anyone have a suggestion on where to buy crown molding...home depot, lowes...or a local lumber provider that has molding and such...

thanks...

 
Sponsored Links
Sawdustguy's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

11-08-04, 08:07 PM   #2  
Sawdustguy
Your only option is to scribe the crown to the ceiling. You can do it with a belt sander.

 
hobbs_m's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 258
AL

11-09-04, 04:33 AM   #3  
scribing???

thanks for the reply...just a question or two???

what is the best way to scribe it??? how can i get the best fit, without removing too much wood in the wrong spot???

i have never scribed something, but have seen it done...i know what it is...do i hold the piece just below it with a level underneath???

 
Sawdustguy's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

11-09-04, 02:30 PM   #4  
Sawdustguy
You can hold your piece up to the ceiling into the mitered position and push the other side up until you see where it's hitting. Mark the crown on both ends of the belly.

Have someone hold the crown on the floor in the same postion it sits on the ceiling and use your belt sander to sand down to the line. "It's trial and error" Sand, fit, sand, fit, and so on. When belt sanding it. Tilt your belt sander backward "Behind the crown" so you're making a "point" touch the ceiling and not the whole top side of the crown, which is typically 1/2".

Sorry my friend, but there is no easy way of making crown fit nicely without sanding and test fitting back and forth.

You really can't use a scribe, because the piece needs to fit into other pieces. Just take off little amounts each time.

If you just hold the crown up to the ceiling and not worry about lining up your miter first, you can see where the highs and lows are. Then kinda gauge how much you need to sand down on the top of the crown.

It takes practice, so don't get upset if you need to make another trip to buy another piece.

let us know how it turns out

 
hobbs_m's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 258
AL

11-09-04, 02:52 PM   #5  
thanks

i can tell you this much...

the part where the imperfection is in the ceiling is on the right side of the fireplace if you are standing in front of the fireplace looking at it...it is a wall that is about 4 feet wide...it will need an inside corner on each side of the molding (one to fit the other wall and one to fit around the fireplace...

question: since i have to trial and error that one piece, should i use a butt joint and cope the other wall molding...or should cope this 4 ft section...

basically: where should i start...should i start the crown on the bad part, or on the good level part of the ceiling and work towards that bad section???

 
Sawdustguy's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

11-09-04, 08:14 PM   #6  
Sawdustguy
I would fit all of your GOOD miters first and then work the remainder of the crown into the bad part of the ceiling.

Take a scrap piece of crown about 12" long or less on each side to find out what the angle is. Then, cut the right wall crown to the proper angle.

Then I would shave the top side of the crown until that piece sits at the same level as the right wall crown.

Don't put any nails 2' and closer to the mitered corner, just incase you need to "tweak" the right crown up or down to meet the bad crown you'll be putting in.

Understand?

No matter what your molding job is, you should always do the best parts first, because if you start with the bad parts, you'll have to adjust a lot more of the good areas to meet the bad than vice versa.

 
Search this Thread