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Staining and installing baseboard


jims's Avatar
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02-05-05, 08:42 AM   #1  
jims
Staining and installing baseboard

I have new knotty pine baseboard to install. It needs to be stained and polyurethaned.

Should it be stained and polyied before installing or after. What about filling the nail holes...before or after poly

Thanks for any advice.

 
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02-05-05, 09:20 AM   #2  
You will be waay ahead in the time by doing all your sealing/staining BEFORE you install any of it. No masking off the floor/walls. After you initially install the new boards, then any burrs or cut area's that are lacking stain, just go back and touch up those little area.

Same with filling nails holes. They will blend into invisible by filling AFTER you've stained it. Most fillers I've used over the year and tried to install pre staining makes the nail hole really stand out. If it's stained however there are huge color selections of putty so it will blend into what you have perfectly as or close to perfect as possible.

 
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02-05-05, 10:16 AM   #3  
I wholeheartedly agree with IHI. Stain and finish it ahead of time. When you fill the nail holes, you may want to wipe the smudge marks off with a clean rag and touch them up with a light coat of your polyurethane. The only drawback to staining and finishing ahead of time is if you turn out to be one piece short. DOH!


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02-05-05, 02:09 PM   #4  
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xsleeper,

If you cut it wrong before it's been stained/finished or while it's still raw, you still have to replace the piece.

 
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02-05-05, 05:15 PM   #5  
LOL, how many times can I remember being 1 piece short, heck even 1 or 2' short. Not having stained lumber when I'm installing it is great since it's an easy fix. But often...well always, I sub out any sanding and staining to my cabinet builder so now that 1 piece I'm short turns into a major event to get it done quickly so I can get paid

 
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02-05-05, 07:12 PM   #6  
Posted By: Sawdustguy xsleeper,

If you cut it wrong before it's been stained/finished or while it's still raw, you still have to replace the piece.
LOL! aw, Sawdustguy... I was referring to the process of having to stain, (wait) seal, (wait) sand, finish the one piece of wood that keeps you from finishing the job.

 
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