Right tools for Finish work

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  #1  
Old 02-15-05, 10:22 AM
The Nailman
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Right tools for Finish work

Hi, I am new to this board and have been finishing my basement for the last year or so and am finally ready for the finish work. I am planning on purchasing a compressor, brad nailer, and finish nailer package from home depot (porter cable). My first question is: what do i need in a compressor? will the small one they sell in the kit be enough or is that usually a bad idea? 2nd: What nails and nailer do i use for what task? I'm guessing finish nailer for shelving and door jambs and brad nailer for thin cassing and base board? If thats correct than what sizes of nails do you recommend?

Thanks!
 
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Old 02-15-05, 03:01 PM
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i like to use 2 1/2" 15 ga. nails when setting door jambs, 1 1/4" 18 ga. nails for casing to jamb, 2" 18 ga. nails for casing to jack stud, and 2" 18 ga. nails for thin baseboard. This assumes 1/2" drywall throughout. If it's thick casing or baseboard, then I'll bump up to 2 1/2" 15 ga. instead of 2".

As a rule of thumb, you want your nail to penetrate at least 1" into the 2x4 framing, if possible.

The PC compressor in the kit is fine- it might be too small for a fast roofer, but it will suit your needs fine.
 
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Old 02-15-05, 04:50 PM
The Nailman
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so would i use the brad nailer for all of the 18ga mentioned above and the finish nailer for the jambs? The finish nailer says it takes 16ga and the brad nailer takes 18ga up to 1 1/4" (that should still get me an inch into the stud though right?)
 
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Old 02-15-05, 07:31 PM
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Assuming your brad nailer shoots a maximum 1 1/4" nail, the only thing you would do with it is pin the casing to the door jamb. You would need to use the 16 ga. finish nailer for everything else, since it will shoot 2" to 2 1/2" nails.

This is assuming you are looking at the #CCFFN250N Porter Cable combo, which my catalog shows for $299.

They make 18 ga. brad nailers that will shoot up to 2" 18 ga. nails, but the one that comes with that combo kit is only a 1 1/4" nailer.
 
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Old 02-16-05, 06:45 AM
The Nailman
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Yep thats the one I'm looking at. Thanks! Any tips on staining? Is stain - polyurethane - sand - polyurethane pretty standard or is that overkill?
Thanks again!
 
  #6  
Old 02-16-05, 01:55 PM
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I prefer to stain, seal, finish all my trim before I put it up. If I'm doing it on the wall, I'll put wax paper behind everything so that I don't make a mess on the wall.

The finish you select is up to you. Personally, I prefer Valspar oil based satin polyurethane. Some woods (like pine) stain up better if you first apply a "wood conditioner"- it helps make the color a little more even when you stain it. After the stain has dried according to the directions (usually 24 hours) we apply Valspar polyurethane sanding sealer, and once it is dry, lightly sand it with 220 grit sandpaper. After the wood is sealed, you can fill the nail holes. Then generally 2 coats of polyurethane gives everything a nice finish.

If you finish the wood ahead of time, I like to fill the nail holes, wipe the trim down good, then give everything a touch-up coat of polyurethane to keep the nail putty from collecting dust.

Be sure you've sanded the trim sufficiently prior to staining. Especially casing has a tendency to have mill marks where it went through the shaper. Often, these don't show up until you've put some stain on. It pays to sand everything with some 120 grit prior to staining.
 

Last edited by XSleeper; 02-16-05 at 01:59 PM. Reason: addition
  #7  
Old 04-11-05, 08:06 AM
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I just went thru the same debate. Go for the Porter cable with the 18ga 2" brad nailer. It will do all the trim jobs. A 2" brad will go thru the drywall and intot he stud. I had to remove a few and they hold very well. They leave a nice small hole to fill. I am really happy with the gun and compressor. The kits with the brad and finish nailer is not as good...for the $$$. A 1" brad is good for picture frames not trim work! The range of the 2" brad gun is good (1"1/4 to 2"). As for the doors...I used screws. The pro's probably wouldn't agree with me but it was good. If I was off or needed to readjust the door I just backed off the screw and did it again. Seemed like a good way for a do it yourselfer! I counter sunk the screw and filled above and it never saw the hole.
 
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