21 inside corners. Do I cope?

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Old 05-12-05, 06:19 PM
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21 inside corners. Do I cope?

I'm attempting to install baseboard trim for the first time and have 21 inside corners. How many of you, professional or not would cope all of those? Is it worth the hassle? A lot of them are in closets and will not be seen.

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Old 05-12-05, 07:19 PM
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If it does not matter if the miters fit, then it won't matter. If it does matter, cope them. It is just about as fast and the joint is always right.
 
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Old 05-12-05, 08:41 PM
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Got it, thanks. On outside miters, can you nail them together or do I have to use a busciut jointer, or does it matter.
 
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Old 05-12-05, 09:12 PM
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I would always cope inside corners. Try to work the same direction around a room. (clockwise or else counterclockwise) That way you will always be making the copes on the same end of the baseboard. You can make your cope, and then if you like how it turns out, then cut the opposite end to it's final length.

Also, if you haven't tried it, try doing your copes with a jigsaw that has an appropriate blade for coping (thin blade, with teeth like a coping saw blade). It's a lot faster- esp for large fancy base.

Outside corners should be mitered, glued, then pin nailed just enough to hold them together.
 
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Old 05-25-05, 09:21 AM
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Sorry, but I'm a newbie to all this. What does coping mean and what does it do for you?
 
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Old 05-25-05, 10:20 AM
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Originally Posted by sx460
Sorry, but I'm a newbie to all this. What does coping mean and what does it do for you?
Coping is taking a coping saw [has a thin flexable blade] and cutting the profile of the wood to insure a tight fit. Coping if done right always looks better than a mitre [45`] cut on inside corners. Since mitre cuts are easier and quicker I usually use them on painted work [caulking will make any gap disappear] but coping is a must on stained woodwork.
 
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Old 05-25-05, 12:28 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr
Coping is taking a coping saw [has a thin flexable blade] and cutting the profile of the wood to insure a tight fit. Coping if done right always looks better than a mitre [45`] cut on inside corners. Since mitre cuts are easier and quicker I usually use them on painted work [caulking will make any gap disappear] but coping is a must on stained woodwork.

I guess I still don't see the difference between a coping cut and a miter cut. Won't a coping cut still be cut at a 45 so both pieces create a 90 like a miter cut?
 
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Old 05-25-05, 04:45 PM
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When you miter a corner, you are putting two 45's together, which only produces a tight fit (i.e. looks good) if the corner is perfectly square, the two pieces of baseboard are sitting perfectly plumb, and you have the lengths of both pieces exactly right.

When you cope a corner, One piece (square end) runs all the way into the corner. If it's an 1/8" too short, it hardly matters. The other piece gets cut on a 45, but then you cut along the bevel with your coping saw so that it will fit over the profile of the first piece. The cope can easily be tweaked, if needed, but generally, coped corners will look 3x better than mitered corners any day of the week, and they don't take that much longer. In fact, I can take every measurement in a room, cut and cope all the pieces, bring them in, and they usually all fit perfect the first time. Coping is the way to go.
 
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Old 05-25-05, 07:10 PM
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If you are painting the trim I would miter them, chaulk will hide any gaps.I have done three home that way an dthey all look great. My opinion.
 
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