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any truth to MDF 'puckering' when nailed?

any truth to MDF 'puckering' when nailed?


  #1  
Old 09-10-05, 10:04 PM
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any truth to MDF 'puckering' when nailed?

I heard from my installer friend that MDF tends to 'pucker' when a nail is shot into it. I assume he means the area around the nail is somewhat raised and is noticable. He said to go with pine instead. Everything I've read leads me to believe that MDF is a cheaper, easier alternative to work with.

Any truth to this 'puckering' theory?
 
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Old 09-11-05, 10:30 AM
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Never noticed MDF puckering from installation. MDF paints well and can look as good as more expensive trim when new. What I don't like about MDF is how it can't handle much abuse. It isn't near as durable as pine.
 
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Old 09-11-05, 10:43 AM
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I thought MDF was harder than pine?
 
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Old 09-11-05, 12:18 PM
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MDF is more dense than pine, and when you shoot nails into some types of MDF trim, the surface of the MDF will become raised around the nail head just as you have described. Often, nail holes in MDF will have to be filled then sanded down smooth before they can be painted. The reason it "puckers" is that since it is medium density, when a nail is shot into it, it won't compress around the nail like wood will- it has a tendency to raise up around the head, or even split such as when you attempt to nail into the end-grain of a piece of MDF fibercore.

This is not a big deal, and shouldn't be a reason why one would avoid using MDF. Its just one of the things you occasionally have to deal with when working with it.
 
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Old 09-11-05, 02:57 PM
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thanks for the replies. It's really a lot easier material to use I think, and cost is much less than pine. I can deal with the occasional bump for the price and ease of use.


Thanks guys !!
 
 

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