Stain n chop vs chop n stain


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Old 10-01-05, 11:35 AM
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Stain n chop vs chop n stain

Never to old to ask for advice:

I've always cut/mitered my trim then stained it... but I'm a plain ole DIYer. About to start working on my trimwork for my new addition... and thought I'd ask for opinions.....

Stain first - or cut first????????

As it's obviously after 9 oclock... you know what I'll be doing while I await a response
 
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Old 10-01-05, 06:28 PM
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I *always* stain and varnish my trim before I install it, unless for some reason it can't be prestained (such as when I have no idea what kind of trim I will be needing). If it's prefinished, then you just have to fill nail holes and touch up the finish.

If you plan on finishing it on the wall, you ought to put up wax paper behind it all. (pain in the butt).

Nice thing about having it prefinished is it can all be done- ready and waiting. Once the walls have been painted, you put up the trim and voila! Done!
 
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Old 10-01-05, 08:17 PM
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I agree with that part.. Question is... do you cut your pieces to fit first then stain them before installation... or stain the long boards first before you cut them? I figure it's 6 of 1/half dozen of the other... but wondered.....
 
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Old 10-02-05, 05:30 AM
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Figure everything long so that you have enough trim to do the job. Getting trim that is the proper length so that you don't have a lot of scrap is usually the best method. Like if your room is 10x14, you'd want two 11's and two 15's when you do your baseboard, not just a bunch of 8's. Of course, if you drive a mini cooper, it might be hard to get those home in your car. heh heh
 
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Old 10-02-05, 05:35 AM
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Big Room - 17 X25 -- There's gonna be some joints along a couple of walls.....
 
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Old 10-02-05, 05:41 AM
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four 9's and four 12's for the baseboard then, unless a doorway breaks up one or more walls.
 
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Old 10-02-05, 06:01 AM
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Yeah - already got those... Now - my original question was:

I've got the wood - I've got the stain - I've got the chop saw - I've got the dimensions -

Do you cut those pieces to fit before you stain them, allowing you to stain the ends/cuts - or do you stain them then cut them, requiring you to touch up the joints before or after install?
 
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Old 10-02-05, 06:41 AM
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>> cut your pieces to fit
>> or stain the long boards first

no, I do *not* cut them to fit... like i said, figure everything long. Stain it long. Seal it and varnish it long. Cut it later. If it's prefinished, then you just have to fill nail holes and touch up the finish.
 
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Old 10-02-05, 07:13 AM
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Thanks bud....... appreciate the input... (Now, where's that darned stain?)

I'm lovin this part.... I'ts amazingly difficult to get pine trim to match/coordinate with oak flooring (yeah, should have spent the extra 50% $$ and bought oak trim)... After lots of experimentation, I've got a pretty good match - involves 2 different stains/sealers in combination to get the color right. Looks good, but it's a pain. Found a perfect "fake trim" match - but I hate that flimsy foam type trim...........
 
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Old 10-02-05, 11:44 AM
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You're right about the two stains. Staining pine is a pain in the you know what. I've always used Minwax Wood Conditioner just before staining the pine- it helps to eliminate dark blotchy patches and gives you more of a consistant tone.
 
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Old 10-02-05, 05:54 PM
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Staining the wood prior to cutting and installation is always quicker. Sometimes it is harder to see your marks on prestainned trim but I believe it is always better to stain and seal a day ahead of time. Always apply your first coat of poly before handling and cutting. This way you won't be worried with any smudges or other marks on the wood. Believe it or not if you have to sand the prestainned wood down to raw it is easier to touch up the raw with stain when the rest of the wood still has poly on it.
 
 

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