crown molding for cabinet


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Old 11-02-05, 01:36 PM
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Question crown molding for cabinet

I want to install crown moldings on a cabinet. The molding is 3.1/2". I thought it would be a simple 45 degree cut (for a 90 degree inside angle). It seems like it's not. my first cut (that I pondered for 2 days) in the expensive molding was wrong. I only have a regular mitre box, no mitre saw. Can I do it? What's the trick? Is it (as it seems to me) a 30 degree angle? He-e-e-el-p!
Thank you, anybody for any input.
 

Last edited by lovetodim; 11-02-05 at 01:48 PM. Reason: misspelled "mitre" - how dumb of me
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Old 11-02-05, 06:27 PM
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How are you setting the crown moulding in the mitre box? Crown doesn't get cut quite the same as regular trim. It needs to rest on the little bottom edge with the little top edge against the back of the mitre box. Wish I could draw a diagram to explain. If you still don't understand I'll try to explain again or maybe someonelse can do a better job of explaining
 
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Old 11-02-05, 06:57 PM
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Well, I don't know about doing a better job, but here goes...

I'm much too young to have ever used a miter box, unless I did it in high school and just forgot. So I hope this explains it correctly for you. What you need to do is hold the crown "in position" which usually means it is resting at a 45 degree angle as you cut, just like it will be sitting on the wall. You should be able to do this by resting one side against the "fence" of the miter box, while the other end sits in the bottom of the miter box. Installing a temporary stop block inside the miter box might help you keep the crown "in position" while you cut, so that it doesn't slip down and toward you.

You also need to have the crown "upside down" when you cut it. The fat edge of the crown (the top edge) will be down when you cut it, but when you take it out and flip it upside down, it will be ready to install. That's the most confusing part. But if you are cutting "in position", as I've described, you should be able to make 45 degree cuts. It just takes some thinking to remember that the top side (as you look at it) will actually be the bottom side when you go to put it up.
 
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Old 11-03-05, 06:22 AM
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Originally Posted by XSleeper
You also need to have the crown "upside down" when you cut it. The fat edge of the crown (the top edge) will be down when you cut it, but when you take it out and flip it upside down, it will be ready to install. That's the most confusing part.

Oops I forgot to mention that part.

XSleeper - I believe you definetly did a better job of converting knowledge into words
 
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Old 11-07-05, 01:10 PM
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Talking Thanks, Crown moldings are installed

Thanks Marksr and XSleeper for great advice, i did cut and install my moldings! (and I'm a woman -- if it matters at all). The position was the secret to it. Thanks a bunch, again. Love to do it myself
 
 

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