Go Back  DoItYourself.com Community Forums > Interior Improvement Center > Paneling and Trim
Reload this Page >

Trim carpenters: What miter blade do you use?

Trim carpenters: What miter blade do you use?


  #1  
Old 11-26-05, 11:19 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 27,159
Received 936 Votes on 854 Posts
Trim carpenters: What miter blade do you use?

Fine woodworking calls for fine tools. I was curious what blades are being used by various finish carpenters. I've been searching for the perfect blade, never having found one that I like. Until I used a blade made by Everlast. It's the Everlast MT1280D. A 12" 80 tooth blade, .080 thickness, .110 kerf, 0 degree hook. (they also have several others that are similar but thicker, and with negative hook).

This blade cuts through oak like hot butter, it's really unbelievable. I got to use it on a project that I was a volunteer on, and was really impressed with it. There were about 5 different saws there, and gradually the workers were all finding out that one of the saws was different- the one with the Everlast blade! I'm going to be ordering a couple ASAP.

But back to the question, I was wondering if anyone else had a blade they swore by. I've used the Freud Ultimate, Woodworker II, CMT, and was wondering what opinions others had on saw blades.

Since this question is specifically for trim carpenters, I figured this would be the best forum for the question, rather than in tools or tool sharpening, where general advice might be given.
 
  #2  
Old 11-29-05, 12:01 PM
Sharp Advice's Avatar
Admin Emeritus
Join Date: Feb 1998
Location: The Shake and Bake State USA
Posts: 10,398
Received 5 Votes on 4 Posts
Hello: X
Always best to use a blade with lots of teeth. Often provides the best final finshed cut and often requires little if any final planning or sanding after the cutting.

Carbide blades have several different tooth styles. Each for it's intended purpose. Some are designed specifically for general purpose rip, cross cutting and/or a combination of rip and cross cutting while others for only ripping or strickly for cross cutting. Some specifically for hardwoods, etc. Read the labels for more detailed info.

Blade choices are like almost anything else...personal preferences. Quality comes with a price. More than that which meets the eye, especially carbide. Which comes in several grades. Not all carbide is the same.

When I sharpen a high quality blade, (read expensive) the carbide does not decinagrate (spelling error?) before ones eyes, as it passes by the diamond blade. Cannot say that for lesser quality (read cheap) less popular unknown brand name blades. Can say quality costing several times more than lower quality blades sharpen differently. One always gets what one pays for...

Which blade to use for trim molding and trim pieces? Good question for a pro to answer. But here again, imo, choice is a personal opinion.

Sharp Advice.
Web Site Host, Forums Monitor and Sharpening Forum Moderator.
Accurate Power Equipment Company.
Complete Saw and Tool Sharpening Services.

Reminder: "Work Shop Safety Is No Accident."

Trail & Errors, Practice & Patience creates perfect sharpening results.
Safety Reminder: "Work Shop Safety Is No Accident."

Sharpeners Quote:
"I can sharpen almost anything, except a dull mind."...

Personal Driving Safety Reminder:
Buckle Up & Drive Safely.
"The Life You Save"May Be Your Own!"
 
  #3  
Old 12-14-05, 08:03 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,964
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
miter blade

I haven't seen the Everlast, yet. Can you get them at big boxes, or are they a specialty item? I prefer as thin a kerf as possible, and as many teeth as I can get, 80-96. I have had good performance from the Diablo 80 tooth 12" on my Bosch. It has laser cut cooling slots in a wierd design, and the carbide teeth aren't as widely offset as normal blades. I have just finished trimming a 3 bedroom house on one blade, and it still cuts good. It runs about $60.
 
  #4  
Old 12-18-05, 05:46 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 27,159
Received 936 Votes on 854 Posts
I got mine online. I've seen a Hitachi blade that looks similar at Lowe's for about $59. They also have an Everlast Magnum 1280D blade listed online that's their "industrial" version which evidentally means it's similar quality but a little cheaper for around $69.

I know what you mean about the thin kerf. Thin kerf blades are usually only needed for saws that are underpowered because of the strain put on the saw at startup and electric braking. It seems to me that thin kerf blades tend to flex too much when the supersharp edge on the carbide becomes a bit dull after heavy use. They also will flex if accidentally pushed too fast. Thin blades also seem to me to have a tendency to build up more of a vibration as they cut, which becomes more pronounced as the blade becomes duller. They have a "ring" to them which thicker more stable blades do not have. As long as thin kerf blades stay sharp, they seem to be of mediocre quality.
 
  #5  
Old 12-24-05, 07:21 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,964
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
trim carpenters: what miter blade do you use

You are right on the thin kerf ringing and flexing, especially in oak or yellow pine. But this last job was predominantly MDF, and it cut flawlessly and no chip-out, with a true. I have a heavier industrial 80 tooth on my radial arm in my shop, and it cuts so smooth and quietly, I could hardly believe it. Basically because it is heavier, I guess.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: