Installing baseboards


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Old 01-11-06, 04:41 PM
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Installing baseboards

I have 2 baseboards, one is nailed to the wall, the other I am about the put on. These 2 will form an outer joint. For it to be a tight fit, the left side of the one baseboards needs to be a lot higher on the wall, make sense?

It seems like measure the two boards, cut them and hold them to the wall where the belong, but when I nail one up, the other one will not line up properly with it.

Any suggestions?
 
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Old 01-11-06, 04:57 PM
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What you are describing sounds like what happens if the baseboard is not sitting plumb (such as what sometimes occurs when the bottom edge of the baseboard falls into the tapered edge of the drywall). When you put the joint together so that it looks nice, the left baseboard gets farther and farther from the floor as it goes left?

If so, you could try tapping a small shim maybe 1/8" thick or more behind the bottom edge of the right baseboard. That should rock it outward, which would bring your left baseboard down.

It also could be that when you cut the miters, the pieces were not sitting flat against the fence or against the table, resulting in a cut that is not a true 45.

One last possibility is that you have 2 different pieces of baseboard that do not have exactly the same profile. If you have 2 scraps, butt them together side by side. If they do not match exactly, you'll never get them to fit together perfectly becasue they are different profiles, different brands, milled differently. Sometimes you run into that in big box stores where they order in some new stock and put it with the old... if the 2 are from different suppliers you might not notice it by looking, but they could be slightly different.
 
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Old 01-11-06, 06:18 PM
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Thanks for your reply. I was thinking maybe when one of the boards was nailed up, it would be adjusted against the wall differently then when I was lining them up on a test.

Should I completly nail one of the boards first, or should I put one nail in to hold it, match up the corners and then nail in the rest?

I stained my baseboards, so I think getting things to look good is harder then caulking and painting!
 
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Old 01-11-06, 06:52 PM
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I put up this angle thing to get an idea of the measurements.
None of the walls are a "perfect" 90 degrees. I have one that is 88 degrees would that make a big difference if both of my cuts were 45 degrees?
So I should adjust the saw to 44 degrees?

Also, I have some walls that appear to be 132 degrees, what would be the angles on the mitter for this? 21 degrees?
 
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Old 01-11-06, 09:29 PM
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Sounds like you've got the right idea. It's a good idea to use a couple scraps as test pieces if you have an unusual corner. once you get the miters to fit nicely on your samples, then it's just a matter of cutting the length correctly. You can usually nail up one side, provided you have the length correct (use your test piece to check it) Sometimes I like to leave the last 32" or so loose so that I can tweak it a bit if needed.
 
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Old 01-12-06, 03:11 AM
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If you adjust your miter to 44 degrees, you will have to do it to both boards. Cutting one board at a different angle will result in a longer cut face on one board. But by all means cut scraps to see if you have it right before cutting the long boards. Good luck.
 
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Old 01-12-06, 05:52 AM
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Thanks guys, I did cut scrap pieces and it did seem like a good fit. So maybe my final pieces were not cut as good.

Do you usually cut the baseboard laying flat or standing up in the miter saw?
 
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Old 01-12-06, 06:10 AM
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I always cut base standing up but I don't have a compound mitre which I believe can be used either way.
 
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Old 01-12-06, 06:14 AM
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You don't get as accurate a cut laying it flat, because the bevel is not in "stopped" increments as your miter is. If all you are doing is cutting 45 degree angles, you can set the saw up with a 45 degree gauge and cut consistently accurate angles, but if your saw will allow it, cut the molding standing up against the back fence like Marksr said.
 
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Old 01-14-06, 10:14 AM
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Stand it up, the margin for error is decreased.
 
 

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