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Removing Paneling


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01-15-06, 11:36 AM   #1  
chriswhitelaw
Removing Paneling

I'm in the process of remodeling the downstairs and would like to know if anyone here has had to remove paneling and had to keep the pieces being removed for future use. The panel was nailed to the boards using panel nails. Is there a tool I can use to slip in between the panels as I want to keep at least 8 feet of paneling.

 
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01-15-06, 02:26 PM   #2  
Yes, get a 5 in 1 tool. It is stiff enough to be wedged behind the panelling above or below the nail line. Lift gently, and the panelling will probably pull off the nail. On the other hand, the nail may come out with it. The only problem I can see you will encounter is if the installer used glue to install the panels. Then you are in deep......you will have to chase the glue with the 5n1 up and down each stud until it releases. Good luck with it.

 
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01-15-06, 02:28 PM   #3  
I've used a stiff putty knife to help work paneling off walls. The big thing is to work slowly, it doesn't take much to damage a piece during removal. Basically any flat bar that can slip behind the paneling will work.


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01-15-06, 04:00 PM   #4  
chriswhitelaw
thanks for the reply's

it took a couple of hours to do but I finally got it done

I took a flat sharp putty knife that was used to scrape up the carpet floor and found 2 wall panels that were still in good to excellent shape. Stuck the knife in between the panels and gently removed the panels with the nails still in the paneling not easy but it was worth it. I think the previous owners also used liquid nails cause of the goo on the panels and the wood.

 
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01-19-06, 06:24 PM   #5  
chriswhitelaw
ASAP question please

also a quick question?

buying new paneling what tool do I use to cut the paneling to size?

 
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01-20-06, 04:11 AM   #6  
My choice would be a cordless small blade circular saw, but since you probably already have a regular circular saw, that will suffice. Just don't let the blade go through more than the air kerfs on the blade to keep the cut cleaner. If the panelling is less than 1/4", you can scribe it with a razor knife and break it over, leaving a pretty clean cut. A jig saw or zip saw will work well for the outlet openings.

 
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01-20-06, 10:12 AM   #7  
chriswhitelaw
Chandler thanks for the help I really appreciate that.

 
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01-20-06, 02:46 PM   #8  
Be sure to use a paneling blade [more teeth=less damage] Also there is less tear out if cut from the back side.


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02-03-06, 02:23 PM   #9  
chriswhitelaw
Is there a way to identify the paneling I currently have? I cannot post pics to show you. My local Menards , HOBO and Home Depot do not carry this type of paneling so what now?

 
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02-03-06, 03:14 PM   #10  
Sometimes on the back of the panelling you will see the manufacturer's tag, stating design, color and dye lot run. Other than that, just taking a sample with you when you shop would be about all I can offer. Good luck.

 
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02-04-06, 05:56 AM   #11  
I used oak paneling in my laundry rm and years later I decided to use the same in my adjacent narrow hallway. Took a piece of scrap with me and went to every store I could find that sold paneling and never did find a match.

Be sure to check all paneling outlets but know that paneling styles are often changed and an exact match may not be possible.


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02-07-06, 07:24 PM   #12  
chriswhitelaw
more stupid questions

ok now that I have chosen a replacment paneling to put up what comes first?

1. paneling
2. carpet
3. baseboard

1. carpet
2. paneling
3. baseboard

or?

 
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02-07-06, 07:33 PM   #13  
Panelling will mess up your carpet, so install the panels first. Then using scraps of baseboard about 6" long, install your baseboard on top of these scraps as spacers. This will give your carpet layers enough room to tuck the carpet after they stretch it over the tack strips. So basically none of the above.
1. Panel
2. Baseboard
3. Carpet

 
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02-11-06, 10:03 PM   #14  
chriswhitelaw
Whoa!

Now this is crazy! as a friend and I are removing the ceiling tiles to be replaced we find this bag in the ceiling. It's a bank bag from Neenah , Wisconsin. Open it up to find a shiny silver plated .25 cailber pistol with a empty clip and holster. Talk about a surprise in the ceiling.

 
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