finishing a drywalled post and beam


  #1  
Old 01-31-06, 01:06 PM
F
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 6
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
finishing a drywalled post and beam

Hi, I have an interior 4"x6" post and beam with 5/8 drywall that I would like to finish with wood. I would like it simple and will probably paint white. Questions, how thick should I have the wood at a minimum (don't want to make the post any fatter than it already is) and what is the best way to cut/ finish the corners. Should I have the seam at the corner, mitred at 45 degrees or keep the edge square and try and make it flush with the wood on the adjacent face of the post. Ideally I would like to 'hide' the seam.

Thanks, any ideas appreciated
 
  #2  
Old 01-31-06, 05:08 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,607
Upvotes: 0
Received 10 Upvotes on 9 Posts
I'd remove the drywall, first off, and use 3/4" lumber, which will build it back out to basically the same size you have, now. You could cut miters and run your edges through a table saw to cut 45 degree beveled edges, but since you are going to paint it, I would just butt the boards up, sanding them flush to the finish of the adjacent board, fill any voids and nail holes, prime and paint.
 
  #3  
Old 01-31-06, 06:37 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,783
Received 871 Upvotes on 762 Posts
I agree, remove the drywall. IMO most butt joints look better than a mitred edge that isn't perfect. You can also float the joints with spackling, sand smooth, prime and 2 coats of paint it will look like one solid piece of wood.
I wouldn't use spackling if you expect the post to recieve a lot of punishiment.
 
  #4  
Old 01-31-06, 06:43 PM
F
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 6
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Sorry, removing the drywall is not an option since it is a supporting post and building code requires the drywall to be there. I have had that verified by the building inspector.
 
  #5  
Old 01-31-06, 06:56 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,783
Received 871 Upvotes on 762 Posts
Did the inspector understand that you wanted to replace the sheetrock with wood trim? What was the reason for the rock to meet code?

You can attach the wood on top of the rock, it is just a little harder to get it all nailed up solid.
 
  #6  
Old 01-31-06, 10:15 PM
F
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 6
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Sorry, I guess I wasn't clear. The post itself is wood and is used to support a beam. The inspector made it clear to me that I needed to have 5/8 drywall on the support post as per building code otherwise I will not pass final inspection (I am doing a kitchen reno which involved removing a load bearing wall .. hence the post and beam). The drywall is there as fire protection for the post and beam, I am not permitted to leave the post 'bare'. The drywall is staying, I am not removing it. Since I don't want the painted drywall look, I was hoping that I could put wood over the drywall but I don't want to make the post too much bigger than it already is.

I think a veneer or wood panel might be too thin to work with especially with the corners, so I am looking for the optimal thickness. I think the butt joint technique is a good idea and will work well. I need to figure out how to attach to the drywall as well

Thanks for your ideas.
 
  #7  
Old 02-01-06, 02:29 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,607
Upvotes: 0
Received 10 Upvotes on 9 Posts
Local codes can get wierd, as well as the inspectors who have a god-like view of themselves. But since you are stuck in that situation, you will aquiesce. If making it too wide is a concern, you could use a beadboard type 1/4" panelling, and if you are careful you can install it without having to dress the corners. Otherwise you can use outside corner molding to hide any aberrations. Attaching it or any trim can be accomplished with finish nails. Also, address the type base you will put around the bottom of it, and possibly quarter round to dress out the top against the beam.
 
  #8  
Old 02-01-06, 07:07 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,783
Received 871 Upvotes on 762 Posts
Have you had your final inspection? Most inspectors won't take your word that there is sheetrock under the wood. It might be best to wait until after final inspection. When nailing be sure to use nails long enough to secure it to the wood behind the rock.
 
  #9  
Old 02-01-06, 11:53 AM
F
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 6
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the suggestions. Off to the the local lumber store to see what they have. I am hoping to avoid corner trim if I can, but it is a Plan B in case I can't get the corners just right.

BTW, the inspector said that they would take pictures as proof that I have drywall behind any wood finish. Regardless, he said that he has ways of determining that the drywall is there .. .and anyway I consider myself lawabiding so I want to do the right thing :-).

Thanks everyone!
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: