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Cutting out paneling


ozmee's Avatar
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Join Date: Feb 2006
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02-06-06, 04:17 AM   #1  
Cutting out paneling

As with many 1970 homes, ours had paneling put extensively throughout. Later on, someone cut out the top half of the wall and papered over the drywall. They cut around the trim so they didn't have to remove it. I'd like to do the same thing in some other rooms as this would save a lot of time. I hate paneling with a passion and want to paper. How would I go about cutting out this paneling. I do not want to have to remove trim and take the chance of splitting it. Plus once the paneling is removed, there is usually some drywall damage. I use compound to smooth over the rough spots. This is not a perfect solution but what else can be done short of tearing down the walls and replacing the drywall?

 
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marksr's Avatar
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02-06-06, 08:21 AM   #2  
Welcome to the forums

If I understand correctly, you want to remove the top portion of the paneling and leave the bottom portion as wainscotting.

You can take a skil saw and set the depth to [or slightly more] the thickness of the paneling. Either using a chaulk line or straight edge [secured to wall] You can then cut the line seperating the top and bottom. This will cut everything but the ends which will need to be cut with a dremel type tool with a small saw blade or chiseled off.

Then it is just a matter of removing the top portion of paneling, repairing the drywall as needed and adding trim to cap off the newly created wainscotting.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
ozmee's Avatar
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02-06-06, 08:07 PM   #3  
Wow you're good!

That is exactly what was done in our dining room!. Except that you can't possibly mistake this paneling for wainscoting. From pix I've seen, they are evenly spaced grooves and this sure wasn't. I wanted to remove the paneling in our bedroom the way that was done in the dining room so that I did not have to remove the trim, since we have moulding between our walls and ceiling. After asking the question I decided to get my prybar and look behind our bedroom paneled walls to verify if drywall was there. Guess what, it wasn't!

This house was built in 1969 and had some little extras stuck in here. Like it has music speakers in the ceiling of every room (which we have yet to figure out how to use) and it has that central vac system, and we paid a pretty penny for this place. I have discovered sub-par contracting work in almost every room. No drywall, not even any insulation between the walls of my bedroom and the bedroom next to it, all I saw was the back of the paneling in that room. Sheesh. Yet they put insulation all under the subfloor as evidenced in the basement.

The reason behind this is that we like wallpaper and even after filling in the grooves twice with joint compound, once the wallpaper dried these grooves sunk in and I had to remove the entire wall of paper plus scrape off the backing. Not a happy camper at this point. But that is another thread. Just wanted to say thank you for responding.

 
marksr's Avatar
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02-07-06, 06:36 AM   #4  
Insulation on interior walls is not common - usually an extra charge when specified by owner/builder.

The built in speakers will have wires coming out of the wall somewhere. It might be disguised by a wall plate.

When wallpapering over paneling it is best to use heavy paper. Unless mistaken they sell a paper/cloth that can be applied first so as to give a better surface for wallpaper.

Although beaded board is the most common type of wainscotting, it comes in a variety of materials and styles.

If the darkness of the paneling is what bothers you most, with proper prep and primer it can be painted.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
bradleyfitz's Avatar
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02-07-06, 01:33 PM   #5  
My entire house is (well, was, now is only partially) finished in paneling over drywall. I feel your pain

I have used a utility knife to cut sections of panelling out (around wall mounted light fixtures I didn't want to remove right away), just use a new blade and a straight edge (level). Paneling is pretty thin (most anyway), it cuts real easy.


Last edited by bradleyfitz; 02-07-06 at 01:49 PM.
 
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