window/door trim with T&G wainscot


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Old 02-08-06, 10:04 AM
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Question window/door trim with T&G wainscot

I'd like to make walls that are sheet rock on the upper half and 1X6 T&G pine on the lower half (wainscot). I'd prefer the paneling to be vertical. The typical method is to use furring strips, but this adds 3/4" to the lower wall thickness vs. the sheetrock. How do you trim windows and doors in this situation? Part of what I want to do is new construction so I could install blocking between the wall studs to attach the paneling to and eliminate the problem, but I also want to remodel some existing rooms to match this that are already fully sheetrocked.
 
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Old 02-08-06, 12:49 PM
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If I understand correctly, you install a mini ledge as part of the chairrail capping the wainscotting. Any windows or door openings would be recessed [with a wood return] where they intersect the wainscotting.
 
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Old 02-08-06, 01:25 PM
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Why cant you remove the sheetrock in the other rooms on the lower part of the walls and block it there too? Even if you do this, you still have a difference in thickness of 1/4 inch (3/4" beadboard vs. 1/2" rock). Either way, I would do as Marksr said and cap it, probably with 5/4 material with a bullnose and a cove moulding underneath, and either return the end or rout it over the casings. To look the best you want the casing to be proud of the wainscotting. That is to say, the casing should be thicker than the wainscotting. 5/4 casing would probably be a good choice. You'll also want the "horns" of any window stools to be notched so they're on top of the wainscotting.
 
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Old 02-08-06, 01:29 PM
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Your doors will likely have jambs that are a standard wall thickness like 4 9/16. If you put something other than 1/2 sheetrock on each side of the door jamb, you'll need a jamb extension which is just a piece of wood that you rip down to the right size to make the door jamb the same level as the wall. In your case, if one side of the door has 1/2" sheetrock, and the other side is 1/2" sheetrock on the upper and 3/4 t&g on the lower, you'd need to add a 1/4" extension jamb onto the door jamb on all 3 sides (preferably on the hinge side, not the latch side). Your extension jamb would stick out 1/4" past the drywall but be flush with the 3/4 t&g, but that's ok. You'll just have to add a 1/4" extension onto the back outside edge of your casing that is exactly as long as the distance from the top of the 3/4 t&g to the top of the casing.

Adding 1/4" furring onto the studs on the top half, to shim the drywall out even with the 3/4 t&g would seem a little easier and would enable you to just cap the seam with a chair rail or something. The you wouldn't need to jack around with the 1/4" strips behind the casing.
 

Last edited by XSleeper; 02-08-06 at 03:09 PM. Reason: additional thought
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Old 02-09-06, 02:29 PM
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So if I understand correctly the idea is to use a thicker casing on the windows and doors. Somthing that's at least as thick (including the 1/2 sheetrock) as the paneling (and furring if you're using it). I assume you would put a border of sheet rock or some 1/2" spacer material around the window/door the same width as the casing to support the portion of the casing that's in the section of the wall with the wainscot. A ledge/cove moulding would be used at the top of the paneling to cover the difference in thickness there.

In the paneled portion of the wall then, the paneling would butt directly up to the casing right? You would have to cut these pieces of paneling very carefully to get a nice fit. Or would try to put some kind of small moulding there?
 
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Old 02-09-06, 08:18 PM
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Not exactly.

In my last reply I was picturing that you would be putting 3/4 t&g directly onto the studs on the lower half, and 1/2" drywall on the upper half. If this is new construction, it might be wise to drywall the entire wall and then put the t&g on top, since that sounds like what you will be doing in the other rooms.

What I'm picturing is, you would need to add an extension jamb onto entire perimeter of the door or window jambs, to bring them out level with your t&g. This extension jamb would be flush with the t&g but out 3/4" past the drywall on top. When you install the door or window trim (casing) it will sit flush on top of the t&g... no need to cut around casing, it will go behind the casing. But on the top half where the drywall is, there will be a 3/4" gap behind the casing. You can treat this one of several ways.

1). glue and nail a 3/4" paint or stain-grade filler onto the back outside edge of the casing (above the t&g only).

2). glue and nail a 3/4" filler of any type material onto the back outside edge of the casing, (above the t&g only) then cover that up with a thin piece of paint or stain grade wood, measuring roughly 1/4" x 1".

3). glue and nail a 3/4" filler of any type material onto the back outside edge of the casing, (above the t&g only) then make a custom corner bead that would cover the side, corner and a portion of the front edge of the casing.

You have the right idea regarding the ledge + cove moulding where the t&g ends and the drywall begins.

Not to change gears, but.....

If you would like to avoid all the headache this causes with trim, and the lower portion does not NEED to be drywalled in your new construction areas, (i.e. not an exterior wall or a fire break) then just nail the 3/4 t&g onto the studs, shim the upper studs out 1/4" and hang the drywall on the upper portion only. That way the drywall and the t&g will be at the same level.

On the areas where you already have drywall, you could install the t&g right on top, then put 1/4" furring on top of the upper studs and hang another layer of drywall on the upper portion so that, again, they come out at the same level. It's a little more drywall work, but drywall is very cheap compared with messing around with expensive pieces of trim.
 
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Old 02-10-06, 05:22 AM
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Tim,

I believe you are referring to what I was saying. Yes I was saying to butt it to the casing, packing out the lower part of the casing the 1/2". Then the bead board will cover the gap leaving 3/4" of the casing revealed, near the wainscoting, and 1" where above the casing where it sits on the drywall. This will work good for when you baseboard. Also If you have no outside corners, I would start at the door , nice and plumb, and work towards the inside corners. At windows, I would rabbet the bottom of the apron so the tops of the beadboards can be hidden under it.

THis is one of those things that has several acceptable ways to do it, and they are all a pain in their own way, and all create different issues to work around. Good luck.
 
 

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