wainscoting

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  #1  
Old 02-11-06, 03:10 PM
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Question wainscoting

I was at a moulding shop where I bought a piece of moulding that was specially designed to be framed like a picture frame and allows you to place a section of wood in the frame (1/2" depth). The frame with the panel attached inside is then suppose to be recessed in the wall. I don't know what this type of moulding is called but on the back of the moulding it is routed on both sides and about a 2" flat surface where the profile on the front is recessesed. The end product is basically a picture frame that is on the drywall that recesses 1/2" with the panel portion coming back out to match the drywall thickness. If need be I can give you the company's website where they show the profile. It gives a nice impression of wainscoting. I have several questions reguarding this. 1. I would need to cut out the drywall where the panels would be recessed. (23.4" x 19" for the largest panels). The moulding and panel insert (I'm planning on using 1/2" MDF) would be flush against any studs. Would I use nails to nail the MDF to the studs and liquid nails around the frame edges where it comes into contact with the drywall? 2. Do I just use liquid nails around the frame edges if one of the panels doesn't line up to a stud?
3. Other then using glue to hold the frame together what else can I use? On my demo piece, I used staples but the staples went through to the front of the moulding where the profile is thin. 4. Is this a bad idea for false wainscoting? I looked at panel and chair rail moulding to do a shadow box effect but I thought this would be more dramatic looking. 5. My husband is nervous about me putting holes in the wall so I want to make sure that I have worked out all of the problems before I start. Do you foresee any other type of problems that I might incurr?
Thank-you for any help that you may be able to offer.
Sandra
 
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  #2  
Old 02-12-06, 12:19 AM
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re wainscot

Sandra,

I haven't heard of this system before. If you would, please post the name of the product and the manufacturers website. And the dimensions you mentioned, is that width by height or?

Jan
 
  #3  
Old 02-12-06, 06:06 AM
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wainscoting moulding

The website that shows the profile of the moulding is http://www.bosleymouldings.com/mb435.htm and the mb435 is the product number. I have no clue what this type of moulding is called and I haven't been able to find out any info on the internet about this technique. The moulding size is 2 1/2" x 13/16.
The panel sizes that I am planning on making are 5 panels that are 23.4" length and 19" height for the longest wall, 2nd wall would have 3 20" x 19" panels, other walls would have one panel at the followings sizes 23" x 19", 21" x 19", 20" x 19". I determine these sizes by allowing 4 inches from the bottom of the chair rail to the top of the moulding for the wainscoting, 4" from the bottom of the wainscoting to top of the baseboard. The wainscoting panels start 2" from either a corner or door casing with 4" in between the panels. This should allow all of the panels to be the same height, and same spacing between all of the edges, and same spacing distances between the panels on the 2 walls that have more than 1 panel. If you feel that I going to use the wrong size panel, let me know.
Again, thank-you for any help that you may be able to offer.
Sandra
 
  #4  
Old 02-12-06, 06:20 PM
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Join Date: Jun 2005
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wainscot

Sandra,

I found mb435 and now I think I know what you want to do. It looks doable to me. First I would suggest that you buy "Decorating with Architectural TRIMWORK" by Jay Silber from Creative Homeowner. It's the best on frame style wainscotting. You can get it from Amazon.

I like 3 inches between the chair and the frame likewise 3 inches from frame to base with something close to that between the frames. At the end of a run you can go smaller. These are reasonable numbers for a Colonial Revival style. These are just suggestions. You should lay out your design with painters blue tape on the wall. Use the tape to create the actual widths, heights, and etc.. With the tape it'll be easy to juggle the dimensions until you get the rhythm and emphasis you want. For example, wide frames will emphasize the length of your longest walls.


To put the frames together I would cut the moulding with a miter saw and then glue and cross nail the joints with a pnuematic brad nailer. After they're nailed lay the frames on a flat surface until the glue dries. I usually use yellw wood glue for this.

When you cut the MDF panels make them slightly undersize to allow for exansion due to humidity. By undersize I mean about 1/16 of an inch.

Since you're cutting away the wallboard there could be a problem in the installation. You'll probaly only have one stud behind each panel and that wont necessarily be centered. I think you might want to do the same thing you do to strengthen a big dry wall patch.Cut some strips of plywood and attach it to the back of the drywal with panel adhesive and screws to provide some additional support for your panels. Panel adhesive on the back of your panels and some finish nails to hold things while the adhesive dries is the common way to install wainscot. Also, have a good vacumn handy because cutting drywall is dusty.

If you have more questions come back and ask.

Good Luck

Jan
 
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