wainscotting seams


  #1  
Old 03-20-06, 03:53 AM
siggia
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wainscotting seams

i just hung wainscotting in my bathroom. the wainscotting came in 8 ft sheets. i cut it down to 41 inches high and glued it to the sheet rock. i used 1/4 round to cover the corner seems.

how do i cover the seems in the middle of the wall where the two sheets of wainscotting meet?

the wainscotting is not made of wood and is some sort of prefab purchased at home depot.
not sure if i can caulk the seem.

thanks for your time.
 
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Old 03-20-06, 04:17 AM
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You probably installed the mdf wainscotting, which is really good product when placed over sheetrock for accent. 1/4 round would not have been my first choice in the corners, in the event there is an unevenness. I would have used a cove type molding. The edges of the cove are the same as the bottom of the chair rail molding I am assuming you will use for the top edge, and will blend in good. The 1/4 round will leave a hump sticking out.
Anyway, assuming, again you will paint the wainscotting, you shouldn't have to do anything to the seams where the wainscotting meet. One should flow to the next one. (that is if you followed the pattern match). About the only thing I can think of is running a bead of caulk down the seam, and wipe it off with a wet sponge to smooth it out, then, prime and paint.
 
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Old 03-20-06, 05:01 AM
siggia
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Originally Posted by chandler
You probably installed the mdf wainscotting, which is really good product when placed over sheetrock for accent. 1/4 round would not have been my first choice in the corners, in the event there is an unevenness. I would have used a cove type molding. The edges of the cove are the same as the bottom of the chair rail molding I am assuming you will use for the top edge, and will blend in good. The 1/4 round will leave a hump sticking out.
Anyway, assuming, again you will paint the wainscotting, you shouldn't have to do anything to the seams where the wainscotting meet. One should flow to the next one. (that is if you followed the pattern match). About the only thing I can think of is running a bead of caulk down the seam, and wipe it off with a wet sponge to smooth it out, then, prime and paint.


the wainscotting is glossy and i don't believe paintable.
 
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Old 03-20-06, 06:01 AM
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I recently installed HD MDF wainscotting in my dining room. I can't remember the brand, but it was a lot easier to install than wood. The face was primed and definitely paintable. I'm not sure I understand the problem with the seams. The product I used had overlapping seams and they were nearly invisible. Even so, I ran a bead of caulk over the seam, wiped it down with a damp rag and painted over it.
 
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Old 03-20-06, 01:32 PM
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Originally Posted by siggia
the wainscotting is glossy and i don't believe paintable.

Although I have never dealt with it I think I know what type of wainscotting you used. If the joints look bad enough you will need to caulk them. I'm sure the material is paintable but will probably require a solvent based primer.
 
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Old 03-20-06, 05:40 PM
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Did you install wainscotting or masonite bead board meant for bathroom/kitchen use? If the latter, you may have a problem painting it. Is is glossy white?
 
 

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