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Sloping ceiling & crown molding - Aiiieeee!!!!

Sloping ceiling & crown molding - Aiiieeee!!!!

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  #1  
Old 03-25-06, 11:54 AM
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Sloping ceiling & crown molding - Aiiieeee!!!!

Hi gang. I'm having a bit of a mental block getting this last joint in my dining room done. Its where a section of crown molding following a sloped ceiling upwards, meets the crown at the vertical wall dividing the dining room from the rest of the house. It's hard to describe without a picture, but imagine a long scalene triangle, with the pointy (acute) corner to the left, a horizontal along the bottom, and the other angle my sloping ceiling. The upper right piece of crown meets another piece that is already butted up against the wall of the ceiling. The joint where they'll meet is a bugger, no???

I would imagine I need to cope somehow (and believe me, I'm having trouble coping...lol) but I just can't figure out how to cut the new piece to butt up against the existing "normal" molding. I have an electric compound miter and a coping saw, but not much in between.

I've searched and googled around, but all the explanations and tips I see are for coping regular 90 degree corners. None of the "cathedral ceiling" tips I saw could directly address my problem.

I have placed a half-dozen explanatory pictures on my site,

http://www.jmhare.com/crown_molding.htm

Thanks in advance for any tips...
 
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  #2  
Old 03-26-06, 02:26 PM
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You are now entering the Twilight Zone.....the zone that doesn't allow math to rule. This is one of the most difficult cuts to make, and it will require trial and error to make it happen. Take a short piece of the crown, say about 10" long, lay it in the precise place and attitude it will be installed in touching the top of the crown on the opposing wall. Measure from the bottom of your scrap to the bottom of the opposing wall. Transfer these measurements to your scrap and cut a back cut miter on the scrap. This will give you a starting point, and you can see what type adjustment you need to make and the proper cope for the tight fit. Post back before you cut through a 12 foot section of trial and error and we'll try to perfect it with you!
 
  #3  
Old 03-26-06, 06:36 PM
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Although I've never had the pleasure of attempting such a complicated crown install, it seems to me that it would be 1000X easier to install the crown moulding along the gable end of the cathedral ceiling first, butt it into the sidewall (cutting the ceiling pitch off the end), then cope the crown that butts into it (you'd just need to know the spring angle of your crown- usually 45). Otherwise, you'd have to cut like a 75 degree angle (spring angle plus the ceiling pitch) on that piece and then cope it... and I dont think you'd find a miter saw that does that?
 
  #4  
Old 03-26-06, 06:55 PM
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I agree, XSleeper; you ought to trim out a right triangle glass where the customer wants profiled case molding to surround the entire triangle. The regular trim crew finished the base, doors, windows, everything, except those two windows then left. Hey, the 90 degree part ain't rocket science, but the two remaining angles are bears and can only be duplicated in a pencil sharpener!
 
  #5  
Old 03-26-06, 08:07 PM
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Ha Ha! I was in a house back in October- we rented one for a week out in Estes Park, CO... nice house with a fabulous view. But of course I was critiquing the trim... On the triangular windows on the gable end of the cathedral ceiling, they ran the bottom casing long, cut the ceiling angle on one end of it, then just butted the hypotenuse casing into the top edge of the bottom casing. Truthfully, it didn't look bad, but that's cheating as it definately wasn't a miter!
 
  #6  
Old 03-26-06, 08:27 PM
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Oh, here's some nice illustrations I found, showing the transition from cathedral to straight ceiling. I don't like linking to other sites, but this is informative and helps answer the original question. http://www.garymkatz.com/TrimTechniques/cathedral-crown.htm
 
  #7  
Old 03-27-06, 08:57 PM
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Not a bad site. I had never thought of using the wedgies in the corners. Gives a different appearance, doesn't it?
 
  #8  
Old 03-28-06, 07:35 AM
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Thank heaven for Dremel...

Thanks for the inputs - I actually got it done yesterday, after some trial and error. I ended up building a "mockup" jig of the angle of the sloping ceiling piece and the existing crown - this allowed me to carefully draw the cut I needed to make. Then cut the bigger chunks out with the coping saw, and finished the rest with a Dremel tool - this is not wood, but extruded Orac poly-something or other plastic moulding. The Dremel worked pretty well...

It was just a case of "sand - test fit - mark - sand - test fit - mark - sand - test fit..." until we had a good enough match. Worked out not too bad for a rank amateur. The other problem I ran into is that the walls were not at a 90' angle where they met either, so I actually had THREE different "aspects" to worry about.

The guy who built this house must have been cross eyed and had one leg shorter than the other, because there's not a 90 degree angle in the place..

Had I been really smart, I would have put this piece up first and then butted the 'standard' crown against it, instead of the other way around.

Live and Learn.
 
  #9  
Old 03-28-06, 04:50 PM
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Congratulations!! Don't feel bad about the sand and fit. That's what we do all day long in wierd situations, where simple triginometry won't work. And, there has NEVER been two walls in a house build at 90 degrees, so don't feel badly. That is why we cope all our inside miter joints and hold our breath on the outside corners.
 
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