Converting to "craftsman" style trim.


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Old 06-08-06, 12:09 PM
S
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Converting to "craftsman" style trim.

We built a house a couple of years ago and although we wanted to put in the "craftsman" style of trim it wasn't in the budget at that time. So currently we have the standard colonial style trim. Is there a way I can use the existing window jam trim and just replace the outside trim to be the flat craftsman look? Or is it more of a pain to do it that way and I'd be better off replacing the jams and trim?

thanks
Doug
 
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Old 06-08-06, 10:28 PM
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Doug,

Ordinarily the jambs are left in place when the trim is replaced. Is there some reason yours might need replacement?



Jan
 
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Old 06-09-06, 01:36 PM
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The bottom jamb (sill?) is not the style we're looking for...it's hard to describe but what we want is for the bottom jam to extend about 1" or so out from the wall and then to each side...ending about .25 or .5 of an inch on the outside of the verticle trim peices...I can't just put up a piece of 1" oak to it because of the radius on the corner of the jamp it would leave a gap there...I've thought about adding a 1" peice to the front of the bottom jamb and then use a round-over bit to create that bit of a cove so it would hide the seam...not sure if that would work...

ds
 
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Old 06-09-06, 11:37 PM
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Doug,

I'm guessing that what you've got is picture frame trim around your windows. That is, the trim has four mitered corners like a picture frame and no window sill. It also sounds like door stop was used around the inside edge. Door stop is about 1/4" thick and 1 1/8" tall with the inside edge radiused. I've seen a lot of that in older homes with aluminum sliding windows. The door stop holds the window frame in place on the inside.

If that's what you've got then yes remove the door stop and rip some one by x stock to replace the stop. After you remove the trim and the stop measure the depth from the window to the wallboard edge. You'll want the new pieces to come even with the wall board so your new trim will lay flat on the wallboard when it's installed. The depth of the piece you cut for your sill will be from the window frame to the edge of the wallboard plus the trim thickness and whatever overhang you like, usually an inch. For the sill width I like to go from the outside to the outside of the trim and add 3/4" on each side. Center the piece, mark it, and then notch it with your jig saw so it sits tight against the window frame and the wallboard.

I would install the sill first and then the sides and top of your new stop. Mitered corners look the nicest. You'll have a nice square edge 3/4" to set your side and top trim pieces on. And remember people like to lean on sills so use finish nails, not brads, to fasten that sill to the framing. The apron underneath will also provide some support.

If you're going full on Craftsman stain and apply, at least, your first coat of finish before installing. Stain is way too messy to put on a piece that's already on the wall.

If I haven't understood your problem ask again.

Jan
 
 

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