Welcome to the DoItYourself Forums!

To post questions, help other DIYers and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our DIY community. It's free!

Fitting Beadboard Around Existing Window/Door Casings


pittpanther's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 50
MD

06-30-06, 06:10 PM   #1  
Fitting Beadboard Around Existing Window/Door Casings

Hello All - I am looking to install some beadboard in a bedroom of ours. I have been reading do it yourself installation instructions as well as watching instructional videos, but can't seem to get a good grasp on how to handle the window and door casings, as well as the existing baseboard.

Can anyone offer some additional detailed instructions on how to properly handle this? Thanks!


Last edited by pittpanther; 07-01-06 at 05:14 AM.
 
Sponsored Links
rjm105's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 22
MA

06-30-06, 08:03 PM   #2  
Hi:

I am a remodeling contractor here on Cape Cod.

I am not sure what type of beadboard you plan on using but I usually use 3/8" Plybead paneling that has 2" OC beads as well as shiplaped edge joints. Can't remember if it is made by Wayerhauser or GP, but your lumber yard should be able to help. You should set this atop your existing baseboard after removing the shoe moulding. You will need to plumb the beads vertically, and then scribe to any out of level baseboard. Abut the door casings and caulk any gaps with an acrylic latex caulk when complete. I usually leave a slight gap for expansion for the caulk to absorb. At the windows, I would use a piece of the paneling as a guide to cut the rear of the sill extensions using a Japanese pullsaw (Shark makes one)to accomodate the thickness of the paneling, then abut the window casings. I would probably remove the apron, then reinstall atop the paneling. You could try to scribe around the apron, but it would be more work, and probably not turn out very well.

If you are trying to use individual 1x2 or 1x8 beaded boards, the thickness may cause you difficulty at these junctions if your casings are of thinner dimensions. In my experience, the paneling looks better, especially in a painted environment.

With the paneling, use panel adhesive and finish nail at the studs to hold in place until adhesive sets.

Hope this helps.

 
Jan2's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 202

06-30-06, 09:15 PM   #3  
The links don't work so I have to ask; can you decribe your window and door casings so we can get an idea of the problem? There's all kind of casing. How far up the wall do you want to go? How far is the stool from the floor? Are you using individual tongue and groove boards or Georgia Pacific Plybead panels?

Post back and we can talk it over.

Jan

 
pittpanther's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 50
MD

07-01-06, 05:15 AM   #4  
Thank you both for the replies. Sorry about the link issue... you may have to copy and paste the links into a separate browser window.

http://www.datability.biz/images/Window.jpg
http://www.datability.biz/images/Door.jpg

I am still a little confused about the baseboard - which is just a single piece. Should I remove it, and then re-apply it on top of the beadboard? If so, what is the easiest way to do this without damaging it? Will the existing caulking just peal off?

Or should I just try to but the beadboard against the baseboard?

Thanks again!


Last edited by pittpanther; 07-01-06 at 10:26 AM.
 
Jan2's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 202

07-01-06, 11:21 PM   #5  
I see all the trim is painted so I assume that the beadboard will be painted. In that cast RJMs suggestion that you use Georgia Pacific Plybead is a good one. Plybead comes in 4' by 8' sheets for about $20 a sheet. It's the least expensive way to go and when everything is painted it will look good. I put it in my own kitchen.

Because of the type of base board you have you'll have to remove it. Start by cutting through the caulk with a utility knife. Use light pressure and make several passes. Any caulk left on the base board can be cleaned off with a utility knife. I would also split the paint along the door casings before removing the base to avoid tearing the paint on the casing. When you replace the base, if you haven't run the paneling all the way to the floor, you have to use some scrap panel to pad out the wall at the bottom so the base doesn't tip inward at the bottom.

If I were doing this I would find a top rail that has a rabbet cut in the bottom. A rabbet is a notch cut into the top rail so that it will cover the top 1/4" of the panel. I would set the top rail to the desired heighth first and I would set it level. Then, if your panel is cut square it will be plumb just by placing the panels top edge in the rabbet. You'll still have to scribe the panels at the walls and casings as they may not be plumb or even straight. At the wall corners remember that two panels will butt together so the scribe doesn't have to be perfect since one panel will cover the end of the other by 3/16" or so. At the doors you'll have to make a nice tight fit although a little painters caulk can be used to tidy up.

At the windows figure the height of your design so that your top rail passes above the stool. That way the top rail will just butt against the window casing. And just like RJM said remove the apron and cut a slot in the back of the stool with a pull saw so panel just slips behind the stool instead of trying to scribe around it. Simply replace the apron when you're done.

The worst part of dealing with Plybead panel is the fact that it comes in 4' by 8' sheets which are awkward to handle and difficult to cut. So, get your design worked out in advance and have them cut where you buy them. I usually buy Plybead at the local Home Depot and they have a panel saw which they'll use to cut the panels for free. When the panels are cut to height they're much easier to handle. If you do it this way bring your own tape measure and find the most competent clerk in the department.

You do have to remember that the panels have a shiplap edge to hid the joint so there is an order to use in instaling the panels. Prime and paint all the pieces before installing them. It's a lot easier to paint when it's laying on a couple of saw horses. And you may want to look at the Georgia Pacific Building Materials website for instructions.

If that's not clear just post back until it is.

Jan

 
pittpanther's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 50
MD

07-02-06, 05:58 AM   #6  
Wow - thank you so much for the informative responses Jan and rjm... I am slowly feeling more comfortable about the plan!

Ok, hopefully, these are the last couple of questions! Should I use some sort of vertical molding (shoe-like) in the corners (both inside and outside corners) to clean up the junction point(s)? Or is it better to miter the adjoining pieces? One guide I was reading said not to miter the inside corners, but to miter outside corners.

Also, I understand the idea of "scribing" (I think!) the panels to the casings, but what are the best techniques for this? Is this best accomplished with a pencil compass?

Thanks again !


Last edited by pittpanther; 07-02-06 at 08:54 AM.
 
Jan2's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 202

07-02-06, 06:15 PM   #7  
For your corners you can use a small molding called a corner cap around here. It's a small right angle molding about one half inch on each side. It's cheap and most molding departments have it in stock just for this purpose. Whoever suggested mitering the outside corners was not working with plybead panels. It's thin plywood and making a nice 2 or 3 foot miter isn't going to happen. Fit it nicely and the corner cap will look just fine.

You can use a little compass and pencil to make your scribe line. If the gap is small a pencil laid against the wall will do. That's why carpenters pencils have flat sides. Though, if your using corner cap you'll have some lee way.

If time permits I prefer to do the scribing before finishing. Since I finish before installing I don't like to chance marring the finish when I scribe a corner.

You're going the right way. The main thing with any molding project is to plan for all the problems before you start. If you're ready for each eventuality as it occurs the installation will go smoothly and quickly.

Jan

 
pittpanther's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 50
MD

07-04-06, 05:19 AM   #8  
Jan2 and rjm105 - thank you again so much for the time you have taken to help me along - it is greatly appreciated!

Well, we purchased our materials - 3/8" GP Jubilee Ready-to-Paint Ply-Bead (13 Sheets), a nice cap (which has a rabbet cut specifically for Wainscotting), and corner pieces. I have the beadboard resting comfortably in the house, acclimating to the temperature/humidity. I will begin removing the baseboard and the apron today (a little nervous about this).

Actually purchased some new tools as well - as we plan on doing some additional woodwork around the house. I bought a tool package from Bostitch, which includes a small compressor, brad nail gun, finish nail gun, and staple gun - which leads me to the next question! What nails (size, gauge, etc.) should I use in each? I was planning on using 18 gauge, 1" Brad Nails in the beadboard - but not sure if this is correct. I wasn't sure what to use for the cap rail and the corner pieces. We are also considering adding some crown moulding. If we do, what nails would we use for it?

Thanks again !


Last edited by pittpanther; 07-04-06 at 07:47 AM.
 
pittpanther's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 50
MD

07-04-06, 12:18 PM   #9  
Phew - 1st baseboard has been removed - very relieved...

 
Jan2's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 202

07-04-06, 04:56 PM   #10  
The only thing you'll attach with 18 ga brads on this project is the corner cap. Everything else goes on with finish nails. The panels and top rail, if it's not too thick, can go with 2 inch finish nails. For the base board go with 2 1/2 inch finish nails. When you attach trim you want to put at least as much nail into the stud at the distance traveled to get to the stud. So, if you're going through 1/2" of trim and 1/2" of wall board you'd use at least a 2" nail But most guys go a little longer. Most finish carpenters prefer a belt and suspenders approach. It beats coming back to fix a failing installation.

Do take a look at the GP Building Materials website for their installation advice. They have a nailing schedule and recommendations for panel adhesive. The primary attachment will be the panel adhesive but there is a logic to the nailing schedule.

Yes. you do breath a little easier once the physical work starts don't you?

Jan

 
pittpanther's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 50
MD

07-06-06, 04:54 AM   #11  
Thanks again Jan2... half-way through the room as of last night. Tough parts to come (window and door casings). So far the outlet cutouts have gone pretty smoothly... knock on wood (or MDF !)...

 
pittpanther's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 50
MD

07-06-06, 06:47 PM   #12  
Ok - beadboard is up and caulked. We will be painting it tomorrow evening. My wife and I were both wondering if a roller will work well - considering the smoothness of the beadboard's surface, plus the grooves... or would a brush be a better way to go?

 
Jan2's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 202

07-06-06, 11:47 PM   #13  
Congratulations on your new wainscot. It makes a real difference doesn't it?

Honestly, I always spray the material before I install. I only do touch up on the wall. If I had to do it on the wall I would brush the top rail and caps. For the beadboard I would try a 3/8 roller and tip off with a brush. To tip off with a brush you use a fairly dry brush held nearly flat to the surface and run it lightly over the paint appled with the roller. The purpose of tipping off is to get rid of the orange peal left by the roller. Tip off parallel to the beads.

Water base paint stiffens quickly so roll a stripe about a foot wide and then tip off. Move quickly and don't try to work the paint too much. Working the paint a lot just makes the brush marks worse. Just roll a stripe, tip off, and go on.

After all your money and effort your project deserves the best finish you can manage. Go to a real paint store like Benjamin Moore or Sherwin Williams and buy thier best trim paint. While you're there get their advice on application, brushs, rollers, and etc.. Again, buy the best. Cheap paint and a cheap brush will produce a cheap finish and you've come too far for that. And, if you clean and store your aplicators properly they'll last for a long time so consider it an investment.

Again, congratulations and do post a few pictures when you're done.

Jan

 
pittpanther's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 50
MD

07-08-06, 06:34 PM   #14  
Thanks again for the great advice Jan.

The beadboard is now painted, as well as the trim. When I got home from work tonight, I took a piece of the newly painted cap, and test fitted it to the top of the beadboard, and to my dismay the rabbet cut is deeper than the thickness of the beadboard (probably by 1/2"). I really did not investigate this too closely at Lowe's since the product was called "Wainscot Cap." Should I be able to find cap that has a rabbet cut of 3/16"?

 
Jan2's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 202

07-08-06, 08:18 PM   #15  
It sounds like they sold you some top rail for 3/4" tongue and groove bead board. They should have some stock cut for thinner bead board. Also check with the lumber yards that carry millwork. I doubt if Lowes will order anything for you but the lumber yards will usually order things they don't stock.

Worse come to worse, take a look around lowes and Home Depot for the bead board kits from PGM. PGM produces rabbeted molding to go with their kit bead board. You may have to buy kit packs that include a top and a bottom rail but the kits are still only about $2 per foot.

Alternatively, if you can find a nice rail that has sufficient thickness on the bottom edge you can put a cove molding underneath it to cover the top edge of the panels.

Before I get carried away with ingenious schemes I think it's best if I wait to see how your shopping trip goes.

Good Luck

Jan

 
pittpanther's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 50
MD

07-17-06, 04:13 PM   #16  
Infinite thanks Jan... the project is now complete! Woohoo!

We searched high and low for an appropriate cap rail with a 3/16" rabbet cut, but to no avail. We did find the PGM Kits at Home Depot, and that was going to be our fall back, until we came across a cove piece that fit nicely underneath the rail that we had originally bought. We are very happy with the results!

Anyway, here are some links to pics (again, I cannot seem to get the vB Codes for images and urls to work... not sure why!):

http://www.datability.biz/images/img_1956.jpg
http://www.datability.biz/images/img_1957.jpg
http://www.datability.biz/images/img_1958.jpg
http://www.datability.biz/images/img_1959.jpg
http://www.datability.biz/images/img_1960.jpg
http://www.datability.biz/images/112-1224_img.jpg

The last picture is from a model home that made us want to give it a try. My wife would like to add the shelf along the entire wall behind the bed - but we are having a difficult time finding the materials. We started looking in the mantle kits, but they are not long enough (we need it to be roughly 108" long).

Anyway, thank you so much again for your guidance Jan. I do not believe I would have had the confidence to go forward with this without your direction!

BTW - I made the mistake of cutting all of the materials in our garage... learned the hard way that sawdust pretty much covers everything! Spent the day yesterday completely cleaning out the garage...!

 
Jan2's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 202

07-23-06, 12:22 AM   #17  
My cheap monitor doesn't quite have the resolution to make out that shelf from the model home. Still, it appears to be a variation on a floating shelf made from Colonial crown molding. The last time I looked Home Depot had some small floating shelves in the shelving aisle. Those would be too small for your project but the details of construction would be clear if you took one out of the box.

In brief, the shelf is made by putting returns on the crown molding and attaching a shelf to the top. To mount it you screw a small ledger board to the studs and slip the shelf over the ledger. To finish you put finish screws down through the top of the shelf into the ledger. HD and Lowes usually have Wayne Drakes book on doing crown molding with a miter saw and, as I remember, he has a section on making floating shelves.

Cleaning the saw dust is just part of woodwork. It, really, only takes a few minutes and you'll have years to enjoy an elegant bedroom. That's a good looking design and installation. I'm glad I could help.

Jan

 
Crocostimpy's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 227
IN

04-10-07, 02:08 PM   #18  
Posted By: Jan2 For your corners you can use a small molding called a corner cap around here. It's a small right angle molding about one half inch on each side. It's cheap and most molding departments have it in stock just for this purpose. Whoever suggested mitering the outside corners was not working with plybead panels. It's thin plywood and making a nice 2 or 3 foot miter isn't going to happen. Fit it nicely and the corner cap will look just fine.
Jan
I realize this is an old thread, but I was searching around and came across it. I have a question with concern to the above statement. I want to put beadboard in my bathroom. I have some outside corners that are not square. It's best to think of it as an outside corner that has a big chamfer on it to make an angled wall about two feet wide. So the angle of the corners would be about 135.

Originally I thought I could miter those outside corners and it would look nice, but I now know, after doing other projects around the house, that the walls are nowhere near plumb and flat. I can't imagine anyone makes a corner cap for a non-square corner. Any ideas on what to do in this situation?

 
Wirepuller38's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 6,190
TN

04-10-07, 04:21 PM   #19  
Corner Cap

How about making your own corner cap by mitering 2 pieces of flat moulding at 22.5 deg. and glueing them together?

 
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator

Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 19,316
NE

04-10-07, 04:33 PM   #20  
I think you'll want to make your own corner moulding. Install the beadboard as close to the corner as you can. Make the corner as straight as you can so that it doesn't have any wavyness to it, shimming/glueing behind the beadboard if needed.

For the corner moulding you could look at using 1/4 x 1 1/2" lattice or mullion cap, ripped in half at an angle (figure out what angle will bisect your corner, such as 22.5 for a 135) then glue and pin those pieces together. (or tape them until the glue has set).

You'll need to use a very nice blade and push it smoothly thru the table saw in order to create a miter that will look good.

You're definately right that it will be a lot easier to try to use a corner moulding on a crooked, unplumb corner as opposed to trying to join your beadboard perfectly on such a surface.

If you did try to miter the beadboard, I expect it would work best if you were able to miter and install the short "chamfered" piece first, making it as wide as the widest part of that wall, and letting it stick past the corner everywhere else. (you'd shim the sidewalls out with some tapered shims so as to meet the back side of that miter- in the areas where the chamfered piece sticks past the corner.) Then when you attempt to fit the side pieces to fit it, at least you would have a perfectly straight miter on each side to work with. It may not be square, but at least it would be straight.

 
Crocostimpy's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 227
IN

04-11-07, 05:07 AM   #21  
Make my own. That's what I was afraid of. ; )

I suppose it's the only way to do it. When the time comes, I may try the miter route with some scrap wood first. I think it would look best that way, if it comes out all right. If it doesn't work out I can always try to make some molding. At least that way it will keep the edges from getting banged up and looking bad.

 
gravyboat's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 3

12-08-07, 06:55 PM   #22  
using cove moulding

I'm having the same exact problem, trying to get a cap installed on top of 3/8" plybead and am trying to visualize how a piece of cove moulding installed underneath the chair rail would help things. I like the pictures pittpanther took, but i see the detail of the moulding well.

does the cove moulding simply sit on top of the beadboard and the wainscote cap sit on cop of the cove moulding? Another dumb question, is the wainscoting cap installed upside down in this installation?

Posted By: pittpanther Infinite thanks Jan... the project is now complete! Woohoo!

We searched high and low for an appropriate cap rail with a 3/16" rabbet cut, but to no avail. We did find the PGM Kits at Home Depot, and that was going to be our fall back, until we came across a cove piece that fit nicely underneath the rail that we had originally bought. We are very happy with the results!

Anyway, here are some links to pics (again, I cannot seem to get the vB Codes for images and urls to work... not sure why!):

http://www.datability.biz/images/img_1956.jpg
http://www.datability.biz/images/img_1957.jpg
http://www.datability.biz/images/img_1958.jpg
http://www.datability.biz/images/img_1959.jpg
http://www.datability.biz/images/img_1960.jpg
http://www.datability.biz/images/112-1224_img.jpg

The last picture is from a model home that made us want to give it a try. My wife would like to add the shelf along the entire wall behind the bed - but we are having a difficult time finding the materials. We started looking in the mantle kits, but they are not long enough (we need it to be roughly 108" long).

Anyway, thank you so much again for your guidance Jan. I do not believe I would have had the confidence to go forward with this without your direction!

BTW - I made the mistake of cutting all of the materials in our garage... learned the hard way that sawdust pretty much covers everything! Spent the day yesterday completely cleaning out the garage...!

 
gravyboat's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 3

12-09-07, 09:41 AM   #23  
trim kit

i went to home depot and they have a couple of trim kits. (i needed both anyway because i broke the basemoulding taking it off.. it pays to use the right tools for this) i ended up buying one from a company called 'pine ridge' that has the base moulding cap. its rabbet is 5/16", which was the closest i could find to the 11/32" plybead that i bought from lowes. i hope the extra 1/32" won't ruin the installation.

since the panel is going to be held in place top and bottom by the rabbets, i think i'm going to forgo panel adhesive and just nail it. whoever renovates the room next (hopefully not me and hopefully not for a long time) will thank me

hope to start putting it up today, wish my luck!

 
Search this Thread