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MDF baseboard install


bsmt_dwellers's Avatar
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08-04-06, 11:45 PM   #1  
MDF baseboard install

I've read a lot of postings on here and it has answered a lot of questions. Some remain

I'm putting up 4 1/4' x 1/2 MDF baseboard with 9 corners of which some are angled greater than 90 degrees. They will be caulked and painted white. I have a mitre power saw but no finish nailer, so a hammer will have to to the job. I can't use glue as this baseboard will be removed when a wood floor is installed in a couple years. I'm probably going to regret having painted the walls before the trim as I'm I'm dealing with goofy walls and an unlevel floor.

1. I have a short wall (about 2 feet) with 2 outside corners. Problem. The wall curves inward reavealing a 1/2 inch gap in the middle. Should I force the board to the wall and if I do, will it mess up the outside corners due to over flexing. My original plan was to use liquid nails, but don't want to cause damage if removed later.

2. Can you cope MDF. I would prefer not having to cope but is that the only way to do inside corners? Is the mitre saw only for outside corners?

3. On outside corners should you glue the pieces together with carpenters glue or attempt to nail them together?

4.I bought 1/4 round for the baseshoe. It is very thin and I'm worried a nail will kill it...could I just apply hot melt glue, then caulk and paint?

5.What size nail to use? It is going into drywall in one part and possibly some plaster on another wall.

Thanks

 
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marksr's Avatar
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08-05-06, 05:55 AM   #2  
I'm a painter and not a carpenter but will try to help the best I can.

#1 - I wouldn't plan on removing the base at a later date. IMO removing the shoemould would be good enough to accomadate flooring at a later date.

#2 - I don't think so. Using a mitre for inside corners isn't as good but caulking will make it look fine.

#3 - Maybe a little of both

#4 - Pre drill the nail holes and you will be fine.

#5 - 6 penny minimum, 8 penny would be better. You shouldn't nail to the drywall but try to nail to the studs.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
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08-05-06, 12:50 PM   #3  
He may be a painter, and claim to make us carpenters look good, but he is right on all counts. I would seriously look into renting a compressor and finish nailer for a day. Nailing the base will be a major PITA with a hammer, on your knees. Inside corners should be coped. MDF speedbase will cope just fine; caulking and painting will make it look good.
Outside corners on obtuse or acute angles will take trial and error, so start with scrap first and fine tune it.

 
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08-06-06, 06:35 PM   #4  
thanks Marksr and Chandler for the much needed advice

I feel much more confident now

Would these finishing screws be easier than a hammer....I only have about 36 feet of trim to do....But I will call the rental place for prices...just very budget conscious right now

Regarding coping which I did once on one piece many moons ago, so I qualify as a complete amatuer...how do you go about getting a good fit?

I'm assuming you trace the side edge profile with pencil on a piece held at 90 degrees...then cut away whatever material to make it lock in like a puzzle....sorry that is the best way I can describe it. I believe I have a coping saw somewhere but lack any specialized scribing tools

 
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08-06-06, 07:18 PM   #5  
The trim screws are fine for the speedbase, but will be problematic with the thinner quarter round without predrilling. Be sure to drive them below the surface so you can fill the hole and paint it.
A good trick to coping is to cut a 45 degree angle for the corner you will be working on. Then, using the profile on the inside of the angle you cut, cope with a slight back cut along the profile. You will want to keep a sanding block handy to smooth out the cope to make a good fit. Good luck and post back if we can help further.

 
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08-06-06, 07:20 PM   #6  
Here's a few pics to help refresh your memory of how to do it. I use a jigsaw with a coping blade, but a coping saw is what was traditionally used in the past.

http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/thexsleeper/detail?.dir=5a08&.dnm=3081scd.jpg

Those photos depict how to cope and backcut so as to join pieces at sharp angles, but you'll get the idea from pics 1 of 9 through 3 of 9.

 
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08-06-06, 07:36 PM   #7  
thanks...I feel I can do this now

I'm going to go practice right now on scraps....before it gets too late for the noise of the saw...threshold question later

 
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08-06-06, 08:58 PM   #8  
wow...I'm floored!

It worked! I can't believe all these years of avoiding doing trim....it wasn't perfect but it matched up well enough that caulk will fill...thanks a lot guys

 
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