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Door Trim


mtwolf's Avatar
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Join Date: Oct 2006
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10-24-06, 03:23 PM   #1  
Door Trim

I have elected to do some of the finish work on my new home in order to save some money. Have come to the trim (i.e base trim around floor, windows and doors. I was holding up a piece of trim against the door frame and i guess have never noticed but does the door trim fit flush with the end of the door jam. I ahve hinges and on the other side a latch (if thats what u call it) that holds the plunger from the door knob. I am probably not making this clear but do i have to "trim" the trim to bring it flush with the jam around on both sides of the door because the hinges and the latch keep it from being flush. Then if i just bring it even to the hinge then i have about an 1/8 of an inch of the jam showing. It just doesnt look right i.e. when i trim the windows they are flush with the frame. not so the doors Help

 
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Wirepuller38's Avatar
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10-24-06, 04:04 PM   #2  
Trim

The trim should be set back 1/8 to 3/16 inch. This is called reveal. If you look at pre-hung interior doors, you will see that they are trimmed this way. Them same reveal should be applied to the windows.

 
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10-24-06, 04:43 PM   #3  
Wirepuller is correct. You need the 1/8 to 3/16" reveal around the doors because the hinges are mortised into that jamb, and so is the strike plate. Having an even reveal allows the casing to clear both. Windows get the same reveal. It's a lot easier to have a reveal than to try to line it up flush, and it looks better too.

 
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10-24-06, 05:48 PM   #4  
Having a reveal also makes it a lot easier to caulk [if painting]


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
mtwolf's Avatar
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10-24-06, 07:56 PM   #5  
Thanx guys makes a lot of sense one more thing when u trim around the door is there a good method to make a seamless cut or joint so the base trim butting up against the door trim looks professional ????

 
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10-25-06, 06:21 AM   #6  
If you are painting the woodwork, caulking will take care of any discrepancies. If stained, cut the base a tad long and install each end first, forcing the middle to the wall to create a tight fit.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
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10-25-06, 10:07 AM   #7  
>> good method to make a seamless cut or joint so the base trim butting up against the door trim looks professional ????

Not quite sure what you are asking... the door casing goes on first, and the baseboard butts up to it. If the baseboard is thicker than the casing is, the corner of the baseboard that sticks out past the casing gets bevelled back so that it meets the front outside corner of the door casing.

Baseboard also usually gets coped on inside corners, which makes a nicer joint than a miter once you get the hang of it. As far as cutting the baseboard long and "springing it" into place, that's fine, but don't make the baseboard too tight or it will crack the drywall on your inside corners.

 
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10-25-06, 01:29 PM   #8  
Trim

A base board too long will also push the door trim out of alignment.

If shoe mold is added after the baseboard, bevel the end where it meets the door casing.

 
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