Baseboard Installation Question

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  #1  
Old 01-09-07, 09:33 AM
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Baseboard Installation Question

Hey all ...I am in the final stages of finishing a complete baseboard trim installation job on my house. I left our master bedroom for the last room and have almost all of the pieces cut. My house has been a real bear to tackle because I have bullnose corners all the way to the floor so cutting the small corner piece has always been a challenge nailing them in and lining them up just right and getting the angles cut right. Anyway, now I am faced with a even trickier problem. The room is not a typical square or rectangle shape. There are two spots in the bedroom that have walls that are not squared off. The wall comes to a sopt where it turns inward a bit at maybe a 25 degree angle and as the wall turns, it turns smoothly and a bit rounded, not like an abrupt turn so it's making cutting the trim very difficult. It goes for a few feet, then turns another 20 degrees or so to make the total 45 degree turn. I know this may sound confusing so maybe I should take a photo and post it but it will have to be tomorrow. Anyone have an idea of how I can cut the trim right so it looks nice and fits well? I have 2 spots in the room like this. I made an attempt at it last night and came up with wasted time. The pieces I cut did not butt up against the wall well and it was almsot too far away from the wall to caulk. I want it to look professional. Any ideas? I will post photos tomorrow.
Thanks in advance!
Steve
 
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  #2  
Old 01-09-07, 04:02 PM
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Send us the pix, but you don't miter inside corners. You cut them at a 45 degree angle just as if you were going to put them down, then back cut them with a coping saw so you have the profile that will sit against the adjoining flat cut piece. This will give you a good joint that can be adjusted to suit the aberrations in the wall angles.
 
  #3  
Old 01-10-07, 11:22 AM
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Chandler ...thanks so much for your reply. I'm not quite sure I get what you're saying but I did see something on This Old House one time where the guys were installing some crown molding similar to what you are describing. Here are the photos of my situation:

http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m267/fsufan8/DSC01152.jpg

http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m267/fsufan8/DSC01151.jpg

http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m267/fsufan8/DSC01150.jpg

http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m267/fsufan8/DSC01149.jpg

http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m267/fsufan8/DSC01148.jpg

Can you give me a little more detail on this method? I can get a coping saw, no problem. So I don't miter cut the pieces for these sections but rather use a coping saw to back cut them? Just a little confused. Let me know if the photos help you describe it a bit more clear for me.
Thanks!
Steve
 
  #4  
Old 01-10-07, 04:34 PM
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What you have are 22.5 degree angles, but they may or may not be true. Try cutting your molding at 22.5 degrees and see if that will fit. If not, you may have to tweak them until they fit. On a normal corner, what you do is run one piece of molding uncut into the corner. The piece that will join that one will be coped. To cope it, cut it at a 45 degree angle just as if you were going to install it that way. After you cut it, use a coping saw and back cut along the molding's design, which you will be able to see clearly against the miter. After a little experience, you will be able to make almost perfect corners, no matter if they are square or not.
 
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Old 01-10-07, 05:05 PM
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Will do ...I will try the 22.5 degree cut tonight and report how it turns out tomorrow.

And I got you on the coping of normal corners. I can visualize it in my head and I do remember a young contractor telling me one time that same method you just described looks real nice but at that time, I didn't get what he was saying (drunk conversation ...it was small talk at a bar). I'll let you know how it turns out.

Thanks for your quick feedback!
Steve
 
  #6  
Old 01-17-07, 12:02 PM
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chandler ...you were right on the 22.5 cuts. It worked and turned out nice after I caulked and painted it. I did have to adjust the angles of one side, though. So the left side trim was mitered at like a 15 degree angle with a 2 degree adjustment on the swivel but the right side was just a 22.5 degree with no swivel. It was this way for the 4 corners I had to do but it looks pretty good. Definitely not luxury home-licensed contractor style but not bad for this DIY'er. Thanks again for the tip.

fsufan8
 
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