Install Wainscot cap first or last?

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  #1  
Old 02-28-07, 07:55 PM
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Install Wainscot cap first or last?

I've always thought that I should strike a level line, install the wainscot (panelling) and then put the cap on last.

I've read of some people putting the cap on first, and then the panelling underneath the lip after the cap is already installed.

What's the prevailing wisdom? Seems like that droopy cap would be a pain to get installed level.
 
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  #2  
Old 02-28-07, 08:21 PM
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I start by installing the panelling along a level line. Then I install the cap last. I suppose you could do it the other way around if you like a challenge. Personally, I'd rather not wrestle the pieces into a tight notch. I don't really see how putting the cap on first would make things any easier. Maybe for someone who doesn't have a level, the cap acts as a straight edge (provided they install it straight and level!)
 
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Old 03-01-07, 03:53 AM
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I agree with xsleeper on the panels first. I strike a level line with a laser, install the panels and then the cap is sure to fit level all the way around the room without sagging.
 
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Old 03-02-07, 04:29 PM
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For loose t&g boards I prefer to do a rabbeted cap or base first. Panels, which are 4' wide, can be done just as easily to a line.
 
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Old 03-03-07, 03:05 PM
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Jan2: another way for the loose t&g is to remove the sheetrock on the bottom half of the wall, install perlins across the studs at the top and 6" up from the bottom. Install the t&g and install base and a flat cap. Looks really good, and you don't have the protrusion of the t&g to deal with.
 
  #6  
Old 03-03-07, 08:36 PM
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Larry,

That sounds like a really good way to do it. It would give your more of an old fashioned built in place look rather than an applied remodeled look. I do have a question though. By a flat cap do you mean a piece of 1x placed over the seam of the wall board and the t&g ? I'm thinking that a 3" wide flat cap with square edges would look nice and crisp on a 36" t&g wainscot.


Jan
 
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Old 03-04-07, 11:06 AM
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They make a flat chair rail (one without the offset) that makes it almost seamless. But your idea would do just as good. Take care.
 
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