Laminate install around baseboards


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Old 08-03-07, 08:46 AM
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Laminate install around baseboards

Is it necessary to under-cut the baseboards before laminate flooring is installed ? Quarter-round molding will be installed after the laminate flooring is completed. Thanks
 
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Old 08-03-07, 09:05 AM
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Nope. I've never heard of undercutting the baseboards. They are either removed and reinstalled or left in place and install the quarter round. If you're installing quarter rounds, leave the baseboard as is. You leave the expansion gap between the flooring and the baseboard. The quarter round covers the gap.
 
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Old 08-04-07, 09:28 AM
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I always remove baseboards. Depending on the profile of the baseboards, sometimes the addition of 1/4 rounds doesnt quite look good, imho...like to a short profile. But to each their own.
 
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Old 08-10-07, 12:52 PM
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My neighbor had a contractor do his plank hardwood floors and the contractor undercut the door jamb to slip the hardwood floor plank underneath. I suppose that enables him to be more careless with the cut on the end of the plank since the jamb covers it up. I did mine and cut the plank neatly right up to the jamb without undercutting the jamb and it looks great. I am definitely with DIYaddict when it comes to baseboards.

The expansion/contraction of the wood plank due to moisture (humidity) variations requires a bit of space between the plank and the walls, door jambs, etc., but the amount of space required is usually grossly exaggerated. Suppose that the plank expanded and contracted as much as some suggest - wow all the nails would be popping or planks cracking from all that movement!

With laminate, it shouldn't be much different, except that laminates should expand/contract less (if any) as they are not solid wood.
 
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Old 08-11-07, 03:37 PM
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The undercut on the door jamb was to place the wood in a position so it could expand and contract without an unsightly gap. It wasn't to cover carelessness. Cutting laminate to an exact measurement and jamming it to anything will cause problems down the road. Yours may look great, and proud of it, but you will either see a gap or you will notice movement in your jamb, so get ready. The distances are exaggerated, just because we are humans and always tend to push the envelope, but they will expand and contract. And for the most part laminate floors aren't nailed, but are floating, anyway, so the nails won't be popping out.
 
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Old 08-13-07, 06:35 PM
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Mine has now been in place without any problems for a few years, so it has gone through a large number of expansion contraction cycles. But it's not jammed against the door jamb either, it fit in nicely but not pushing against the door jamb. I don't expect any problems and will sleep nights very well.

The nails I was referring to are the ones in solid plank floors, the thin laminates are obviously not nailed!

The expansion/contraction of wood is minimal.
 

Last edited by DIYaddict; 08-14-07 at 10:36 AM. Reason: Unnecessary quote removed
 

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