options in ceiling coverings


  #1  
Old 11-26-00, 05:54 AM
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We have recently added a 20 x 32 room onto our house. The ceilings are vaulted; and in order to give the room a "warm" feeling we were considering putting up beadboard on the ceiling. However, when we talked to several people at home improvement centers, they told us that it was 5 times the cost of drywall and didn't come in 4x8 sheets. So I need to know what less expensive options are out there for me to consider-giving us the same (or close to), look of a wood paneling?
 
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Old 12-03-00, 11:57 AM
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Why not use paneling? It comes in a wide variety of wood grains and colors and would be a price compromise between drywall and the beaded board (which is 1X3 and put up one board at a time).
 
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Old 12-05-00, 07:50 AM
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Thanks we have considered that option, hoewever, we were told that because paneling is so thin and there would probably be changes in temp. (using it on the ceiling), that we could experience a buckleing effect. They also said that if the ceiling wasn't exact in measurement, that we would see seams if we had to cut to fit. It was then suggested that we try a 3/4 in. tongue & groove pine which would give us the look we want, and the cost was the same as using the paneling. The only drawback is that I would have to seal it myself and it only goes up one board at a time. Of course we are still undecided and need to know that if we do go with the tongue & groove wood, is there anything we should be concerned about when attaching this to the existing drywall?? Any comments would greatly be appreciated.
 
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Old 12-05-00, 12:00 PM
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Slat style, ruff cut siding looks good, and gives it that log cabin look. It comes in lap fit or tongue & groove.
I would use long galvanized screws into the rafters, through the sheetrock.
It cost more to use siding over the cost of paneling, but the looks outweight the cost.
 
  #5  
Old 12-10-00, 04:06 AM
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Thanks for your comments Perry - we're gonna go for it and do as you suggested. I do believe that in the long-run we'll be thankful we did. It's the "look" we want.
 
  #6  
Old 12-10-00, 04:46 AM
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Cool

I have done my vaulted ceilings like that. Both the family room and the Master bedroom. Also did the wall by the Fireplace. All with ruff sawn cedar.
 
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Old 12-15-00, 11:30 AM
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O.k. Perry - one more question - If I use the ruff sawn cedar, does that need to be treated in any way before it's put up? Thanks!!!
 
  #8  
Old 12-15-00, 01:02 PM
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Or after it is installed, put a clear sealer coat, but it being inside, I wouldn't bother.
Redwood is another option. It also looks sweet, and may be cheaper in price, depending your regional supply of lumber. Wood has gotten to be high dollar hear in Texas.
 
  #9  
Old 12-15-00, 11:58 PM
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I think Perry is right on, but do install sheet insolation with a vapore sheet,sheetrock under the finish product keeping the moisture from gettin into the attic space vaulted ceiling do not vent well and the moisture will come back into the finish ceiling.
 
  #10  
Old 12-16-00, 08:26 AM
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The way I read it was, they were going to go right over the sheetrock that's up there.

Yep, if they were going straight to the vault rafters, it would be a real good idea to get a moisture barrier. Moisture and wood don't like each other.
 
  #11  
Old 07-19-04, 09:04 AM
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Moisture with tongue and groove pine ceiling

Hi, I have a popcorn textured ceiling and want to put tongue and groove knooty pine on the ceiling. Someone told me that mold would grow between the ceiling and the wood, if I dont remove the texture. Is this true? If so, could I paint a moisture proof coat on the under side of the pine? Thanks. Tom
 
 

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