Crown on a sloped ceiling

Reply

  #1  
Old 08-20-07, 12:37 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 88
Crown on a sloped ceiling

I'd like to install crown molding in my kitchen. However, the problem is that the ceiling is sloped, which causes the profiles no to line as one board is wider than the board that i'm trying to join it to. It seems like there should be a simple solution but I can't figure it out. Any suggestions ?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 08-20-07, 03:01 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,968
Welcome to the world of math. Didn't like it in school, did ya? It always comes back to bite us in the backside. First, you will have to determine the angles that you will be turning, then divide it by two. Then cut both pieces of crown at that angle. Of course if you have a turn, it will become a compound miter, and will necessitate you determining that angle as well and setting your saw up differently.
In this instance, alot of your angles will be trial and error, as no ceiling/wall has ever been build plumb nor square. I usually take two 2' pieces of the crown and use them as sacrificial template pieces, cutting them and recutting them until I get a good fit. Then I remember the angle and miter and cut the real pieces.
Cutting only one piece of the crown won't allow the profiles to match up at your turning points. Likewise cutting the pieces at different angles will do it also.
 
  #3  
Old 08-20-07, 05:46 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 19,364
Yeah, that's a tough one. I'll add to what Chandler mentioned, and hopefully you'll make some sense of it... even if math wasn't your best subject!

The first thing you need to do is cut a bevel off the top of your crown that will be installed level, along the lower wall- the wall that the angled ceiling meets. This bevel will allow the front edge of the crown to follow the angle of the ceiling when it is in position. Failing to cut this bevel would mean that the crown which gets installed level (on the lower ceiling) would not fit tight against the ceiling, and it needs to! I'd install that crown moulding on the lower ceiling first.

Assuming you need to turn the corner and go up the angled part of the ceiling, you would need to install a small triangular piece to turn that inside corner. It will be level on bottom, just as if the crown was turning the corner on a flat ceiling. But the top edge of the crown will be the point of the triangle. To figure out how long to make the bottom length, you'd measure the rise of the crown and make a pencil line that far down from the angled ceiling. Then you'd level a line from the bottom of the crown that you have installed on the lower wall, and mark it with a pencil. The intersection of these 2 lines represents the bisected angle that Chandler mentioned. You would probably want to copy that angle with a bevel square and cut a couple scraps and see if it will work.

Illustration of this triangular transition piece:

http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base_images/zp/cathedral_crown_3-01.jpg

This is pretty difficult trim work, so if you can understand the above and can get it to look good, we'll give you Kudos. A LOT of Kudos. LOL

If that sounds too complicated you can cheat- and use a plinth block instead. It will separate the two pieces of crown with something large in the corner that you can butt into.
 
  #4  
Old 08-20-07, 10:14 PM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 202
Buy a copy of "Crown Molding and Trim: Install it like a Pro" by Wayne Drake. You can get it at Amazon.com. Wayne's book has the best description of this kind of work that I've seen.

After you study the book you'll see why that little triangular piece is necessary. When you actually try it you'll see that Xsleeper and Chandler have given you some good advice. It never goes as smoothly as in the book.
 
  #5  
Old 08-21-07, 03:55 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,968
I forgot about the triangular piece. Very useful, especially when the angles exceed the ability of your saw to cut. Thanks XSleeper and Jan2.
 
  #6  
Old 08-21-07, 05:16 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 19,364
Another way some guys do it is they find some crown with the same profile that is slightly larger, and install the smaller crown on the lower wall and the larger crown on the gable wall. That way the two pieces can meet without the need for that triangle. They won't match perfectly 100%, but it's usually close enough.
 
  #7  
Old 08-22-07, 10:42 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 88
Thanks

Who knew math could actually be useful.
 
Reply


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:26 PM.