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Gap between Laminate Flooring and Wall


vashwood's Avatar
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09-24-07, 08:51 AM   #1  
Gap between Laminate Flooring and Wall

So I took down all these 1ftx1ft mirrors that covered a whole wall, which I talked about here.
http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=316437

Now the base moulding doesn't cover the gap between the flooring and the wall. You can see a couple milimeters of gap. I'll take pictures later. But is there an easy way to fix this without redoing the laminate flooring?

 
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09-24-07, 09:44 AM   #2  
What room is this in or is it a hallway? Is it just 1 wall? You can either replace the existing baseboards with new baseboards that will cover the gap or install quarter round mouding. The bad part would be how funky would it look if you don't replace all the baseboards and/or install quarter rounds throughout.

 
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09-24-07, 10:25 AM   #3  
It is in the living room. It's only one wall. It would look funky if I didn't replace all the baseboards

 
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09-24-07, 10:41 AM   #4  
Well, baseboards come in all different sizes including the height and the thickness. If you can find one that's very similar to the existing one but is thicker (so it covers the gap) you're good to go. I'm just not sure how they're made. I've typically seen the taller they are, the thicker they are, but I could be wrong.

If you only replace the baseboard on that one wall and it's bigger (higher) or looks different than the other walls, it just wouldn't "match".

 
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09-24-07, 07:00 PM   #5  
This is an example of what is showing beyond the baseboard. You just see little holes here and there.

http://img225.imageshack.us/img225/3809/img3697zx1.jpg

Hopefully I can find a thicker version of that same baseboard. Are those styles common?

 
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09-24-07, 08:20 PM   #6  
Oh! That little hole in the middle???? I mean...how many are there? Is it really bad? Are you talking like 10 little holes or it's all over? If it's only a few holes, I wouldn't replace the baseboards. I thought there was a gap. Like as if the whole subfloor was showing at the baseboard and the baseboard wasn't sitting on top of any of the flooring.

Anyway, if there's only a few holes, I'd fill it up with a sealant. There are color sealants you can buy at the big box stores. Check back though as the pros may be able to give you better advice.

 
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09-24-07, 10:00 PM   #7  
Yeah. The gap is about 1/2" and the Baseboard is about 1/2" thick. So the baseboard 'barely' covers the gap. It just doesn't cover all holes like you see in the picture. There are about 10 of those.

 
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09-24-07, 11:30 PM   #8  
The usual answer is quarter round. It's ordinarily finished to match the base boards.

 
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09-24-07, 11:34 PM   #9  
I could use quarter round, but then it just wouldn't match the other walls

 
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09-25-07, 04:32 AM   #10  
Use shoe mould or quarter round. Put it on the base of every wall for continuity


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09-26-07, 11:58 AM   #11  
Does anyone else recommend that I use some kind of colored-sealant to fill in the holes?

 
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09-26-07, 09:37 PM   #12  
If you know the manufacturer of the material and the style/color numbers, they will have a repair kit available for it. If you chip or otherwise damage your floor, they sell these repair kits so you can try to fix it before replacing it. I would do one of two things here. Either get a repair kit that matches your material and fix all the owies, or pull that particular piece of base off, take it to a cabinet shop, and ask them to mill you enough base to cover the section of floor in question that is the same profile, but thick enough at the bottom to do the job. Someone would have to be looking pretty close to notice that section was a little thicker at the bottom. If some one did notice and comment on it, do they really need to be there? They obviously didn't come to see you, they came to pick your house apart.

 
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