Window Trim and Drywall Problem


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Old 10-19-07, 08:01 PM
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Window Trim and Drywall Problem

Hello everyone,

I'm new here and have some projects coming up so I decided to stop lurking and join on in. Especially since I have a problem on the first project! Thanks in advance for any help.

I just had a new window installed as water was getting in the old window. This caused me to replace the drywall under the window to make sure the insulation was OK. In the bottom right corner, the new drywall is pushed out by about 3/16s It's a gradual clearing from the left to the right. The drywall on the right side of the window is fine so now I have a problem of getting new trim to fit this corner.

Should I try to remove some of the drywall and mud over it to keep it's integrity or maybe some wood putty, shims and eventually caulk around the whole corner?

Again. Thanks!

Chris
 
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Old 10-20-07, 05:46 AM
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Welcome to the forums Chris

If the wood trim is to be painted, caulk it - it won't show after it's painted
 
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Old 10-20-07, 06:03 AM
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Thanks for the welcome and thanks for your help.

Yep, I'm painting it. Sorry, but can't remember the names for the different pieces. I take it that I'll have to shim the right side piece of wood. This will "bring out" the board to match the lower one. I then would caulk the resulting gap on the side as well as the gap on the lower board.
 
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Old 10-20-07, 06:06 AM
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Hi Chris,

Glad you have been enjoying the forums- we hope we can be of assistance as you tackle your projects!

The first thing I would check is to see whether the window is pushed in all the way. If your new window has a nailing fin, the window sometimes has the ability to move in and out quite a bit because of the flexibility of the nailing fin. So it could be that the area where the drywall sticks out is actually showing up the fact that the window is too far out on that corner. If the exterior of the window is already trimmed and caulked, it probably isn't going to move any!

Otherwise, 3/16 is not a big deal to just trim right over. How you go about it depends on the type of trim you will be installing. For instance, if the window has a stool and apron, the "ear" of the stool would just get notched out over that hump.

If you are putting casing on all 4 sides, you would simply need to tip the casing so that it fits tight against both the jamb and the wall, which would alter the miter. The easiest way to do that is to shim that corner of the casing as you cut it, so that it matches the "tipped" angle at which it will be sitting. Sometimes it makes sense to beat the drywall down or chisel off the high spots in places where the trim will be covering it all anyway.

If it's going to be painted and caulked, then you don't have to worry much about a little gap here or there, although it's always best to get joints tight so that the caulking is kept to a minimum.
 
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Old 10-20-07, 08:08 AM
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Hello xsleeper,

The window does have a nailing fin and looks to me it is tight all around.

I like brute force... kidding. I think we're good to go. I tested your trick of using a hammer on a small area and it looked OK to me. Of course, it does mess up the drywall but it will be hidden. I continued and then added more screws into the studs just below my pounding. Checked it out with two pieces of wood and am now going to start measuring and cutting.

We can close this out and thanks a lot for everyone's ideas.

Chris
 
 

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