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finishing mouldings


boomski's Avatar
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02-16-08, 05:25 PM   #1  
finishing mouldings

Hello folks I've been a lurker here for Quite some time and had a question that I could not find an answer too using the search tool. So I'm refinishing the halls in my home and the previous owner painted over all the beautifly stained mouldings in this area, (it should be a crime) I've ripped everything out and I'm in the prosses of finishing the walls and will soon be reinstalling new trim (base, case, and maybe chair rail). My question is can I prefinish the mouldings before attaching them to the walls? I plan on using 18 ga nails and an air nailer and will probably finish the wood with minwaxes stain/poly 1 step finish. I recently remodeled my kitchen and replaced a few pieces of trim in there and finished them once they were in place, that was tedius work for only a few pieces and I was hoping to be able to do this larger volume in a more productive manner. any ideas are apreciated. thank you, Phil

 
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02-16-08, 07:20 PM   #2  
The short answer to your question is "yes". Once the trim is up, you will just need to fill your nail holes with colored nail putty wipe them smooth and clean with a rag, then touch up the nail holes with some of your Polyshades, otherwise the nail putty will become dusty and discolored.

If you are happy with the Polyshades, then by all means use it, but in my experience, oil stain followed by several coats of clear poly gives much better results.

As for the nailer, 18 ga nails will probably work fine, but you may need 2" long 18 ga brad nails if the nail will have to also penetrate 1/2" of drywall.

 
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02-16-08, 10:43 PM   #3  
I used the minwax product last time to limit the steps I would have to take on the moulding I was worried about making a mess on my walls and floor. If I'm going to prefinish the pieces this time I can see taking the extra steps to do separate stain and poly coats. I assume the same thought applies, just fill the nail holes with colored putty and touch up with clear poly? would it be best to buy colored putty or mix a little stain with some regular putty to better match the color?

as for the nails, i had intended on using 2" nails (the max the nailer will do) I know from reading here that 2"-18ga is about the bare minimum. Ive been on the fence about this since I started planing this project, I'm a tool **** at heart and I would love to give myself the reason to justify a 15/16ga nailer but I figure the 18ga will probably work out better if I'm prefinishing anyway (smaller hole to hide).

 
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02-17-08, 04:05 AM   #4  
Use the pre colored jars of putty! Before they came out with them we had to mix our own putty - the jars are so much easier and not near as messy it may take 2 different colors to get a perfect match.

My prefered method for stained woodwork is to stain, poly, sand, poly, install, putty sand and apply finish coat.

btw - welcome to the forums!


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02-17-08, 06:27 AM   #5  
so when you say finish coat you don't mean just touch up the nailing sites? you do the whole piece again once its installed. as previously stated I did a few pieces on another project and found working with the pieces on the wall nerving and slow.

 
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02-17-08, 10:18 AM   #6  
I'm a pro painter so it isn't a big deal for me to paint/poly installed trim. Applying the last coat after install insures a good looking job. There is a possibility that just touching up the putty will show. As a pro, I can't take that chance but it may work out just fine for you.


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02-17-08, 10:51 PM   #7  
Do yourself a favor and use liquid nails behind all your trim. It will pay off, as it will keep your trim from coming loose over the years. I have door casing headers in my house that can support my full body weight hanging from them.

Good Luck

 
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02-18-08, 06:44 AM   #8  
Thanks for the replies folks. marksr I probably will end up doing whole finish coats I want the mouldings to look as good as I possibly can do them and don't want to be replacing them because of my own impatience at the last step.

I cleaned my garage out 2 weeks ago and found that I have enough chair rail to do the hallways, does chair rail in the hallway seem stupid to anyone, my mother-in-law has it in her hallways and it looks pretty good there, I was thinking about maybe doing the same, not really sure though.

 
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02-18-08, 12:53 PM   #9  
I've only painted a few homes that had chair rail in the hallway. Basically it depends on personal taste although I suspect it would look better in a wide hallway than it would in a narrow one.


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