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Door jamb/trim cut for installing cork floors. How?

Door jamb/trim cut for installing cork floors. How?

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  #1  
Old 03-13-08, 01:20 AM
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Door jamb/trim cut for installing cork floors. How?

I am installing cork floating floors 7/16" in my laundry room and bathroom. I read that I need to remove the quarter round and trim under the door jamb and/or trim. Any suggestions on the best way to do this? I appreciate any thoughts.
 
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  #2  
Old 03-13-08, 01:33 AM
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Use a small thin-edged prybar to work the 1/4-round off.

To cut the jamb, use a handsaw: Find a scrap of plywood etc. about 3/8" thick you can lay the handsaw on, flat, and get just a hair more height than the flooring.
 
  #3  
Old 03-13-08, 01:54 AM
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thanks

Thanks for the quick reply. I appreciate it. How far should I cut into the trim and/or jamb? Any secrets to removing the quarter round without snapping it. I am wondering about that for sure.
 
  #4  
Old 03-13-08, 02:44 AM
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As you are using the small prybar you will see where the finishing nails are holding it put the prybar next to the nails, at the back of the wood and pry out slowly from on edge to the other.
 
  #5  
Old 03-13-08, 03:26 AM
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Originally Posted by danattherock View Post
How far should I cut into the trim and/or jamb?
You can cut right through to the stud, no problem, and the pieces will fall away. Two reasons we undercut: 1) The flooring needs as much as 1/2" clearance on all sides, because it expands with seasonal humidity. 2) Undercutting the door frame is easier than trimming flooring around this complex shape.

Originally Posted by danattherock View Post
Any secrets to removing the quarter round without snapping it.
A really nice tool to use is the small prybar pictured below. One end will slip into small cracks - it's almost sharp. It can wiggle fragile mouldings loose. I insert it by tapping with the heel of my palm, then tapping down to nudge a gap open. Then it's safe to work along the moulding applying firm pressure here and there until the moulding is free. If you lever against drywall, protect the wall with a putty knife - this spreads the impact.



Also pictured is a Japanese style saw. Because it cuts on the pull stroke, the blade need not be thick so a cut requires that much less energy. These are easily controlled, and ...just better than traditional Western saws in every way, hands down. They're a lot more common in North America than a few years ago, at last. It's a perfect tool for cutting jambs.
 
  #6  
Old 03-13-08, 06:36 AM
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thanks

Thanks for the insights and the pictures. Where would I find the Japanese saw. Any brands that I should look for. I have never seen that type of saw before.
 
  #7  
Old 03-13-08, 11:51 AM
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Some big stores began stocking them last year.

This mail order tools company used to be the only supplier:

http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.a...&cat=1&p=42884

...and they still carry the best selection.
 
  #8  
Old 03-13-08, 03:49 PM
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Irwin has pull saws now. The big box stores carry them.
 
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