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Crown Molding in a "Round" Shaped Room

Crown Molding in a "Round" Shaped Room

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  #1  
Old 04-12-08, 07:36 AM
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Crown Molding in a "Round" Shaped Room

Hey Friends, have been asked to install crown molding in what is referred to a "turrett" room. Basically, there is a series of short wall sections (3 ft) each with one window, then the wall angle changes, another wall section, wall angle changes, etc. The result is a "round" room that projects off the corner of the house. I have hung my fair share of crown, and am very good at it, yet, have been fortunate to deal mostly in "square" absolutes (90 deg. inside or outside corners with the occassional 45 deg). This 22.5 deg. is a new one and want to run a scenario by the group.

Tell me if my logic holds water....

90 deg. corner- back cut at 45 deg. and cope

45 deg. wall sections- back cut at 22.5 deg. and cope - cut other end to sit flush with adjoining wall at 45 deg.

22.5 deg. sections- back cut at 12.25 deg. and cope - cut other end to sit flush with adjoining wall at 22.5 deg.

Worst case, I can always miter the joints as we will be painting the finished project. But have seen too many poor mitered joints and am a stickler about my trim work.

Thanks in advance
 
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  #2  
Old 04-12-08, 10:18 AM
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Crown

22.5 divided by 2 is 11.25.
I would measure each angle to be sure. A degreee or two will affect the fit.
I think you would get better results by mitring the joints rather than coping. Just my opinion.
 
  #3  
Old 04-14-08, 06:42 PM
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Thanks Wire, I appreciate your response. Sorry about the math error, I guess my fingers got in the way when I was typing.... happens.

I was surprised at the minimal response, I guess I stumped the other pros and mods...... Looks like I'm on my own on this one.

Will definately measure each angle separately as I know none of them will be set according to the original blueprints of the house, thats part of the fun of home improvements.

Thanks - Chris
 
  #4  
Old 04-14-08, 07:05 PM
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No, we just don't step on each other's toes if a good answer is given, except to agree with it. Ken likes to cut accurate angles, whereas I like to cope joints. I spend less time doing my joints, but his probably turn out alot smoother than mine. I cut mine once, and he probably cuts several times, but it works out. If you are able to protract the center of each angle, then you have it made, by cutting the angles to those measurements. Good luck with the project and let us know how it turns out, and post some pix, too. We like to see finished projects.
 
  #5  
Old 04-14-08, 07:18 PM
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(Brant nods in agreement with Larry)

Ken pretty much summed it up. If it's going to be caulked and painted, I probably wouldn't waste my time with coping the joints unless you are more comfortable with doing it that way. If coping can be done just as fast and achieve a better fit, then knock yourself out. If you don't have one already, the Bosch DWM40LK is a handy tool that takes all the guesswork out of miters and crown angles. Might pay for itself on a job like that.
 
  #6  
Old 04-15-08, 03:40 AM
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Now you've done it! Gotta check this out more. New tool.
 
  #7  
Old 04-15-08, 04:44 PM
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Thanks guys, what fun......

Part of experiencing a new aspect of your job is learning the best way to do it. Yes, this job happens to be a paint and caulk job. But what I want, is a procedure for when the call comes in to perform a stained install. One where there is little room for error and can't be covered up by a bead of caulk. That is how I define myself. This unique install will send me leap years ahead and I am looking forward to it. I plan to treat it as a stained install even though it is not. Unfortunately, I don't have 22.5 degree walls in my home to practice on.

So if I rewind and repost my original message and tell you its a stained Oak install, could you offer any advice

Will secure pictures if I have any brain power left to remember, after tackling all these angles.
 
  #8  
Old 04-15-08, 05:23 PM
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Crown

If I were doing stained crown, I would cope rather than mitre and stain the cope. This make any gap less noticeable.
 
  #9  
Old 04-15-08, 07:06 PM
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Ohhh boy. Found this in the Hartville Tool catalog beside the toilet today. Interesting addition . It divides your angles for you.
 
  #10  
Old 04-18-08, 01:48 PM
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Pictures

For the curious, I have attached a picture of the house rendering and layout. Should help all visualize the "round room" - BTW we are going to put crown in most of the downstairs, not just the round room.

Yes, there may be a new tool purchase in my future

http://i282.photobucket.com/albums/k...turrettpic.jpg

http://i282.photobucket.com/albums/k...rettlayout.jpg
 
  #11  
Old 04-18-08, 02:31 PM
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Cast moldings are great for round rooms.


Photo Credit: Cast Designs & Supply

The new toy for the angles for moldings sounds wonderful. And, to think how many pieces of molding have been miscut and laid aside.
 
  #12  
Old 04-19-08, 07:51 AM
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czizzi,

Where were you (or contractors like you) when i was looking to hire!

I am just a novice DIY'er. I just hung some crown in a rectangular room. What I found interesting while reading this thread was the opinion that mitres will give you a better joint than coping. I read a bunch of posts on this board as well as a few books before tackling this project and the basic conclusion I came to was anything other than MDF should be coped to account for expansion of joints. Seeing that you are a stickler for clean trim work, I am curious to see if you agree with my conclusion.

Also, as silly DIY'er FYI - I had some issues figuring out the angles on my project (I'm a little slow ), so I just put together a few scrap blocks of 1 X that I had in my basement to test both my inside and outside mitres. I know it's probably a big waste of time for pro's but i have to say the test joints served as good reference throughout this project and I am sure they will come in handy as i hang crown through out the rest of my house.

Good luck.

Regards,

Gianni
 
  #13  
Old 04-19-08, 09:35 AM
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Gianni

I don't think the advise given had to do with expansion issues, the guys were simply saying, "why bother with the extra work of coping if you are going to caulk and paint anyway". For me, my work is not defined by the effective use of crack filler (i.e. caulking) and I'm confident everyone else in this post also takes great pride in their work.

Each job predicates the level of precision waranted. In my case, this is a higher end home in a prestigious neighborhood. If this job were to hide poor cracking seams at the ceiling joint in an inner city rental property, I might take a different tact.

Using test pieces of lumber to check your joints/angles is an excellent idea and has been offered in the past as help in these forums.
 
  #14  
Old 04-19-08, 06:18 PM
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BTW, they do make totally flexible molding that would actually do a real round room. It can't be stained though, only painted.
 
  #15  
Old 04-20-08, 03:40 AM
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Gianni, I do this for a living, and still make test blocks for each job. Inside right, inside left, outside right, outside left, mark them and leave them on the saw and verify my cuts before I make them. Sometimes your brain can take a holiday from the ceiling to the saw, so it isn't too far fetched. Anything you can do to make the job go faster, easier and more professional....do it.
 
  #16  
Old 05-16-08, 04:33 PM
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Update - Crown in a round room, thanks to all that particpated in the discussion. Yes, I bought a new angle tool which helped, but the install was still a PITA. But the room is beautiful now, thought I'd share some pics with all of you. One Before pic, and 3 after pics.

http://i282.photobucket.com/albums/k...i/DCP_0848.jpg

http://i282.photobucket.com/albums/k...i/DCP_0869.jpg

http://i282.photobucket.com/albums/k...i/DCP_0870.jpg

http://i282.photobucket.com/albums/k...i/DCP_0871.jpg

This is why I love to do home improvements for a living.....Wonderful results.
 
  #17  
Old 05-16-08, 05:58 PM
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Cool! I've gotta use up 10 spaces and wait 180 seconds.
 
  #18  
Old 05-16-08, 06:25 PM
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I should add that the client changed thngs at the eleventh hour and request to make it a 2 part crown install instead of a traditional 1 part. Layed a base plate flush to the wall and installed 4 5/8" crown on top of that. The blue paint took 5 coats to cover even after tinting the primer with the final color.
 
  #19  
Old 05-17-08, 05:14 AM
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Had to do the same thing in a doctor's office last week. Turned 7" speedbase upside down and install crown on it. Looked pretty good after the painters got through. I really think it made the room look more elegant, like yours did.
 
  #20  
Old 05-18-08, 02:14 AM
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What a beautiful room! What material is the moulding you installed? MDF? Were all your joints were coped? Did you prime/ prepaint the moulding before installing? Did you prime/ paint the walls before installing the moulding? Why are there electrical outlets so close to each other? DIY'ers want to know!
 
  #21  
Old 05-18-08, 05:11 AM
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Originally Posted by moike View Post
What a beautiful room! What material is the moulding you installed? MDF? Were all your joints were coped? Did you prime/ prepaint the moulding before installing? Did you prime/ paint the walls before installing the moulding? Why are there electrical outlets so close to each other? DIY'ers want to know!
Materials - PFJ 4 1/4" Colonial Base Turned Upside down Offset down 1 " from the ceiling (used spacers to get the offset). Plus an overlay of PFJ 4 5/8" Crown Molding. The joints were mitered. The crown was caulked & painted in place on the wall 13ft in the air.

The Walls were primed with a with a deep base primer tinted to 50% of the final color. The finish color was cut and rolled to 4 coats using 18" lambskin roller (plus every accessory we had, 3", 4" & 6" mini-rollers depending on the size of the area) . Deep Blue turned out to be a real challange. In fact, after the 3rd coat, we hit those areas where you could still see a peak of primer through the previous coat with an extra roll (so certain areas actually got 5 coats). We used BMoore Regal Matte paint, so the coverage had nothing to do with the quality of the paint, but everything to do with the color.

The house was wired for holiday light candles to be placed in every window and operated by a dedicated switch that controled all windows on the front of the house. The close proximity of another outlet are the actual live room outlets not on the switched circuit.
 
  #22  
Old 05-18-08, 10:56 PM
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Originally Posted by czizzi View Post
The house was wired for holiday light candles to be placed in every window and operated by a dedicated switch that controled all windows on the front of the house. The close proximity of another outlet are the actual live room outlets not on the switched circuit.
What a great Idea! Thank you.
 
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