Tongue & Groove Paneling Installation

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  #1  
Old 07-03-08, 12:42 PM
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Tongue & Groove Paneling Installation

I am preparing to install T & G Knotty Pine in my basement vertically. I have researched the install methods and have the following key questions to confirm:

1 - Finishing - Most on line tips indicate you should apply the stain, paint, etc before the install. I just want to confirm that is the best way since I saw some videos on line that showed the install unfinished.

2 - Finishing - Most tips say to finish both sides with a stain to protect the wood for a basement install. My question is this really needed if you have a vapor barrier and 3.5" studded wall? Is this overkill? I would like to save time and just finish one side.

3 - Installation - Some of the tips suggested glueing the paneling to the studs/furring strips/drywall and many did not even mention glue - most that did were referring to the install over drywall but not to studs/furring strips. Are there any hard/fast rules or guidelines on this? I would prefer NOT to glue it but if it keeps it from buckling or warping then I would consider it.

Any help you could provide would be appreciated.

The DUDE Abides !
 
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  #2  
Old 07-03-08, 04:41 PM
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Welcome to the forums Dude!

I prefer to apply the stain [if any] and 1-2 coats of varnish/poly before install - it's quicker If you brush or roll [] the poly, be carefull to not get too much build up on the the T&G - runs/drips can make it harder to put together. The final coat should be applied after installation.

Wood that is coated on all sides is more stable than when just one side is coated. IMO stain doesn't seal the wood all that well - if I was to go that route I'd spray a coat of poly on the backside. I don't know if it is needed

As long as the T&G is adequetly nailed you shouldn't need any glue.
 
  #3  
Old 07-06-08, 06:46 PM
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Was hoping to avoid the back side but maybe one coat of poly for good measure.

thanks for your help

dude out
 
  #4  
Old 07-07-08, 03:58 AM
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Thinning the poly about 10% will make it apply quicker and it still should do a good job of sealing the backside.
 
  #5  
Old 07-07-08, 07:12 AM
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pre-finished ?

Consider using pre-finished if you don't want to stain it. I've been using pre-finished end-matched to finish a cabin and it is working great. The pre-finish is a water-based poly so it won't yellow with age, which some people might prefer. It obviously saves a lot of time and I think the cost is about a wash. I've been getting it for $2 a square foot from a lumber yard.
 
  #6  
Old 07-07-08, 07:19 AM
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Thanks - don't care for the end matched - buying full pcs and going vertical

I am using min-wax wipe on poly satin sealer just to keep the wood sealed and minimize yellowing.

Getting it for about $1.11 sf unfinished - stumbled on a mill with some inventory to move - sometimes it's better to be lucky than good.

Dude is good to go
Thank you to all you DIYers that responded - great forum
 
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