How to nail crown molding?


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Old 10-09-08, 05:40 AM
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How to nail crown molding?

I am putting up 3 3/4" finger jointed crown molding. My question is, how far apart should the nails be? Should I nail into every stud, every other stud, every third stud, or some other distance?

thanks,
Judy
 
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Old 10-09-08, 11:08 AM
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The bottom should be nailed into every stud! A long nail in the middle of the crown can attach it to the top plate. The top can be trickier, especially if there is no wood to nail it to [often the case on 2 opposing walls] Liquid nail [or latex caulk] will help and you can criss cross the nails to help them hold a little to the drywall.
 
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Old 10-09-08, 11:29 AM
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Thanks for the advice. What is your advice about mitered or coped inside corners? I am a little worried about my ability to cope. I tried it once on baseboards and I couldn't get the hang of it.

Judy
 
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Old 10-09-08, 11:42 AM
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Coping gives a better fit but since you'll be painting the crown, miters should look ok after you caulk them.
 
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Old 10-26-08, 05:51 PM
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As stated you want to get a nail into ever stud available. I always use simple wood glue on the material, much easier to clean up than construction adhesive and once dry it aint going anywhere.
 
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Old 11-06-08, 08:38 AM
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What I did was to make backers to nail the crown molding into. If you picture the space that will be behind the crown once it's installed, you'll have a wedge-like shape.

Using 2x4's I made the backers, leaving about 1/8" of space behind the back face of the molding for clearance for any irregularities in the wall or ceiling, that I then screwed into the top plate of the wall with countersunk screws.

The first room I did I made the backers the whole length of each wall, but then realized that it was a waste of material. The next room I made each about 6" long. That way I could get two screws in each one, and have plenty of room leftover for nails. I spaced them out about every 18" or so, or closer if after dryfitting I determined I'd need more holding power because of a badly uneven wall or ceiling. And I had some doozies in my house! In one instance I ended up countersinking a screw into the meatiest part of the molding because I didn't think the finish nails would hold it. Good thing I was painting all the trim.

I'm getting ready to do this again in our current house, although we are going to stain all the trim so I'm going to have to impove on my coping skills. The hardest part about using backers like this is actually making them. It takes a table saw to do it. If you don't have one you may be able to find someone who does. I think it's worth it because you don't have to worry about hunting around to find somewhere for the nails to grab.
 
 

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