Caulking Baseboards ..yes or no


  #1  
Old 12-14-08, 03:45 PM
Fox E's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: S.W. Ohio, in the boonies
Posts: 15
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Caulking Baseboards ..yes or no

I've caulked the baseboard gaps on the top side. These baseboards are on a new floating composite hardwood floor. There are a few obvious gaps between the floor and the baseboard (slab not level?). Looks like about 1/8" space in some places, 1/16" in others. Do I caulk these gaps or just enjoy them as insect habitat?
TIA
Eric
 
  #2  
Old 12-14-08, 03:57 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 27,319
Received 1,979 Upvotes on 1,774 Posts
If there are gaps that you can't live with, baseshoe is your option. You'd nail it to the baseboard, not to the floor, since the floor must continue to "float".
 
  #3  
Old 12-14-08, 04:59 PM
Fox E's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: S.W. Ohio, in the boonies
Posts: 15
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the quick response X!
Base shoe, like 1/4 Round? I remember using that to cover bad linoleum edging in my old kitchen. But will that flex enough to follow the floor contour? I just don't think that would look right in a modern decor (office). Any idea on how much a 22x12 floating floor moves during hot and cold cycles? Since latex caulking stays flexible, would that not have enough flexibility?
 
  #4  
Old 12-14-08, 05:15 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 27,319
Received 1,979 Upvotes on 1,774 Posts
Baseshoe is similar to quarter round, but it's 3/4" tall and 1/2" wide. It usually matches the baseboard in color, and there's nothing abnormal about it- it's just as normal to see baseshoe as it is to see baseboard. It's flexible enough to push tight against the floor in most cases.

A 1/16" or 1/8" bead of caulk might be flexible, but it probably won't have enough adhesion to hold if the floor moves. Some caulks attract dirt. A messy caulk job could easily ruin an otherwise clean looking edge. Asking opinions in the flooring forum might give you some expert opinions. I'm guessing they won't recommend caulk either.
 
  #5  
Old 12-15-08, 02:57 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,817
Received 875 Upvotes on 766 Posts
I second the use of shoe mould - that's pretty much what it's made for. Don't forget to prime and paint it prior to installation. It may still need another coat of paint after install but you won't need to brush next to the flooring
 
  #6  
Old 12-16-08, 08:53 AM
R
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Concord, Massachusetts
Posts: 16
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I'd either leave it or apply a shoe molding as stated by MArk.
Next time consoder scribing to the floor for a tight fit - saves laboe later.

regards, Robert Robillard
 
  #7  
Old 12-16-08, 07:25 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,607
Upvotes: 0
Received 11 Upvotes on 10 Posts
I agree with the use of shoe molding. Scribing works sometimes, but a job I had recently had a new addition (built plumb and square) and an older part (less than plumb and square) I had to install continuous 7" speedbase. I told the owner we would need to install shoe to help with the uneven flooring. I explained the speedbase bent front to back and the shoe bent up and down. He wanted to know why I couldn't scribe it and make it fit. After telling him once I start scribing such an uneven floor, by the time I got back around to square one, his speedbase would only be 4 inches tall. He understood and agreed. Much nicer job.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: