Fastening options for wainscoting

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  #1  
Old 03-14-09, 08:37 PM
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Fastening options for wainscoting

Hi,
I've got a really low-budget update in mind for my parents' house but I'm struggling with a good fastening solution.

I plan to use 1X4's and some small decorative molding to create the look of wainscoting without the price that goes with it. (Yeah, I know, it's been done before; I know it's not my creation. ) How can I fasten everything solidly?

I want the 1x4's to be farther apart than 16" OC, so I couldn't use the studs even if they happened to be exactly where I needed them behind the drywall.

One option is to cut away the drywall to the desired height and install sheets of MDF. While ideal, sheets of MDF are expensive and I want to see if I can make this work without removing any drywall. The money saved would easily pay for the paint and new base and crown molding.

The closest thing to a satisfactory solution I've come up with so far is to fasten the base board and upper trim assembly to the studs with nails and the occasional screw to help prevent separation from the drywall, then, using either biscuit joints or pocket-hole screws fasten the vertical 1X4's at each end to the base board and upper trim assembly. To help keep them in place, use a construction adhesive along the length of each vertical 1X4 to keep it tight to the drywall.

That's probably what I'll end up doing, but I wanted to see if anybody has any better ideas here first. You don't have to have a completely different plan, tweak mine any way you like.

Thanks,
Jeffrey
 
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Old 03-15-09, 02:00 PM
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Jeffrey: consider using PL400 construction adhesive under your boards and tack them in place with 7/32"x2" narrow crown staples. They will hold sufficiently until the glue dries and will allow you to install them plumb and square. Otherwise, you are good to go!
 
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Old 03-16-09, 08:40 AM
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I'm not sure I follow you chandler. In most cases, there won't be anything behind the vertical pieces except half-inch drywall. Do I tack them to the drywall with the staples? (I don't think my nailer will handle that size staples, but I can work around that, heh.) I feel like I'm overlooking something 'cause I don't see why you'd need to tack anything up just to hold it until the glue dries.

Unless, maybe you're thinking of everything being assembled, glue applied, then lifted into place on the wall? I'm probably going to go with biscuit joints (even though I really wanted an excuse to buy a nice pocket screw jig, lol), because I need to assemble this on the wall. If I build it on the floor I'll end up with a nice square grid. Since this house isn't brand new, perfectly square items tend to not fit where they're intended to, so I'm 99% sure I'm going to have to level and install the upper horizontal trim piece then install the baseboard following the slope (if any) of the floor. Then I'd come back along and install the vertical pieces. There might not be any floor slope to deal with at all, but those are some long odds.

Are we on the same page, or are we reading different books?

Thanks,
Jeffrey
 
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Old 03-16-09, 02:30 PM
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Jeffrey, That's why I suggested the staples, so you won't have to wait for the glue to set up while you do the work. If you tack the wood at the bottom, you will be driving into the bottom plate. True you only have sheetrock, but the staples will tend to splay out when you drive them and will have sufficient holding power until the glue dries. Do it one piece at a time to take into consideration the differences in the floor height, etc, which you would never be able to handle as a wall.

Larry.
 
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Old 03-16-09, 08:20 PM
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Oh, ok, we're on the same page now. But I don't think I'll be needing the staples. If I do things correctly I shouldn't even need the adhesive, not anytime soon anyways. The vertical pieces will be held in place at both ends by biscuits*, so unless I'm using misshaped stock (which I'll prevent while picking through the lumber-supply's piles) or the wall isn't flat (which I'll have to fix to make this look as good as it does in my imagination) the pieces will be held tight without needing to tack it in place.

That's the plan anyways, and we both know how things can go once you start using the word "plan" when talking about this kind of work. I'll probably end up having to tack stuff up that I didn't even know goes on the wall.

Thanks,
Jeffrey

*I'm considering the pocket screws again, they're much easier to keep the two pieces exactly flush during the actual joining; biscuit joints on the other hand are easy to goof up, especially when not in the controlled workspace of a shop. The downside is that the screw holes will have to be on the exposed side of the stock, and I really dislike using a body filler on woodwork... particularly finish and trim; it just feels like cheating on some level. The guilt is compounded by painting over it. I cheat, then I lie about it, lol.
 
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Old 03-17-09, 07:21 PM
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I forgot to ask this earlier, but why did you suggest PL400 adhesive in particular? Simply 'cause you use it and know it's an all-round good performer, or does it have a particular property that would make it ideal for my purposes?

I know, I've got a never ending supply of questions; just be thankful I sort through them instead of letting them all escape my brain.

Thanks for the input, hopefully I'll have some pics of the finished product soon!
 
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Old 03-18-09, 04:41 AM
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Mainly because I use it alot without failure. You can also use Power Grab, but it is a little more expensive. It will adhere instantly. Any good paneling adhesive will work. I use the construction adhesive....just because. Keep the questions coming. It keeps us on our toes. We'll await the pix.
 
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