Garage interior paneling

Reply

  #1  
Old 08-19-09, 06:03 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: South Florida
Posts: 1,166
Garage interior paneling

Hi, I need to finish the interior side of the exterior walls on a garage/workshop. It's 2x6 framing and will be insulated but it won't have A/C for awhile, so it will be damp (south Florida). Also there are two big garage doors so I imagine one or the other might occasionally get left open in a rainstorm.

Drywall seems complicated and hard to clean to me for a garage and there are moisture issues. Ideally I'd like something I can easily wash down since garden and woodworking tools will be hung on them. I've looked at masonite-type paneling and the like, but I'm sure they swell up if they get damp. I've also noticed something that looks like 1/4" plywood called "moisture-resistant" something that has smooth surfaces both sides at Home Depot, about $11/sheet. Another thing I was curious about is a white sheet plastic panel (4x8) at HD.

Thoughts on best choices?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 08-19-09, 07:08 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 44,323
Well primed and painted drywall can withstand getting wet from an occasion rainstorm with the doors left open. Other than plastic, formica or tile - I doubt there is anything that can be sprayed off repeatedly with a water hose.

If it was mine, I'd consider using osb/plywood on the bottom half and peg board above it. Painting the osb will give it more protection against water but I'd be leary of cleaning it with a water hose.
 
  #3  
Old 08-19-09, 09:20 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 72
I did my garage w/ stainless steel color garage liner/peg board from HD. Hung with 1.5" drywall screws. They look great w/ the ultimate cabinets I got on clearance from sears. Four reasons for this garage liner:

1- ease of install. Cut to shape, hang, and that's it. More versatile than drywall in garage and still maintains firecode in my area. I don't believe OSB would, could be wrong though.

2- if damaged, so easy to replace, just unscrew the panel, and hang new one.

3- Handles moisture OK for me, just make sure and leave that gap between panels, 1/8" works for me. Another tip, put the screws in the predrilled pegboard holes and back them out a turn or two to allow some movement, my panels all stay straight even wtih moderate moisture conditions.

4- if you need to get behind the panel, run some wire or other utilities, so easy, just unscrew and put back. Won't work with your other options you are considering.
 
  #4  
Old 08-19-09, 09:38 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: South Florida
Posts: 1,166
Phattspatt, this pegboard stuff is basically masonite, right? Made in brown, white (and I guess SS)?
 
  #5  
Old 08-20-09, 06:55 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: South Florida
Posts: 1,166
Does anyone know if there would be any building code issues with using pegboard?
 
  #6  
Old 08-20-09, 06:57 PM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 21,029
On the wall connected to the house and the ceiling..yes..must be fire resistant.

Exterior walls probably not..but it will be a pain if you plan to insulate.
 
  #7  
Old 08-20-09, 07:01 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: South Florida
Posts: 1,166
Garage is detached, so I guess no code issues.

Why a pain if I insulate? I was wondering about those little holes . . .
 
  #8  
Old 08-20-09, 08:32 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 72
yea, masonite sorry didn't clarify. I suspect you could special order from big box the metal versions, galvanized and ss metal peg board panels as well, those could be sponged down but they are going to be more $$ than the $15/4x8 I paid.

But now I am curious, insulation in detached garage in s. florida, maybe the garage has a nice AC system to keep the '68 mustang nice and comfortable? I hope so.
 
  #9  
Old 08-21-09, 06:26 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: South Florida
Posts: 1,166
Originally Posted by phattspatt View Post
yea, masonite sorry didn't clarify. I suspect you could special order from big box the metal versions, galvanized and ss metal peg board panels as well, those could be sponged down but they are going to be more $$ than the $15/4x8 I paid.

But now I am curious, insulation in detached garage in s. florida, maybe the garage has a nice AC system to keep the '68 mustang nice and comfortable? I hope so.
No Mustang, but a workshop - without A/C woodworking tools rust, hardwoods warp, finishes won't dry, etc. etc . . . not to mention that it's brutal working out there, even changing the oil on the . . . well, it ain't a '68 Mustang.
 
  #10  
Old 08-21-09, 06:14 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: South Florida
Posts: 1,166
Maybe I'm being dense, but I'm not sure I see why pegboard over insulated walls would be a pain . . . something to do with the holes I guess, but what exactly is the concern?
 
  #11  
Old 08-22-09, 08:28 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: South Florida
Posts: 1,166
Or, to put it another way, does anyone see a problem with putting pegboard over fiberglass insulation?
 
  #12  
Old 08-22-09, 03:52 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 44,323
I don't think it would be a problem but with fla's humidity you will want a good vapor barrier if you do intend to install HVAC later on. The plastic might get punctured with the hooks. I used to paint for a builder in Orlando that used peg board paneling on the inside of the exterior garage walls and it worked well although I don't know if he insulated those walls.
 
  #13  
Old 08-29-09, 08:34 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: South Florida
Posts: 1,166
Marksr, if I understand it right, I the vapor barrier would be on the warm side of the wall. In Florida, at least when A/C is installed, that would be the outside, right against the builder's paper that's under the sheathing. That means there would not be a risk of puncturing the liner under the pegboard.

On the other hand, the batts would be right on the back side of the pegboard. Not a problem?

Do I need vapor barrier in addition to the backing on the insulation material?
 
  #14  
Old 08-29-09, 04:27 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 44,323
I'm a painter not a builder or insulater but I've been around a lot of new construction including in florida. If I'm remembering correctly they always hung plastic over the insulation [it was unfaced] in all the new homes. The houses I painted were normally block construction or stick built with masonite or some type of osb siding. I left fla in 1991 so things may have changed.

You might try posting in the insulation section - I'm sure they know more than me
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes