removing paneling from drywall

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-12-10, 05:46 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Rhode Island
Posts: 6
removing paneling from drywall

Help! I just bought a house and there is wainscoting on the lower half of the dining room walls. It appears to be some sort of paneling approx 1/8" thick and glued on. Originally I thought it was vinyl but it looks to be cardboard or something akin to a masonite material. They also attached a faux headboard in the master bedroom which needs to be removed. How can I unglue this stuff without completely destroying the drywall?
Thanks!
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 01-12-10, 07:26 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 9,995
Hi pmk, not a pro on this, but will at least give you a response. Most of the glues I use on a job, construction adhesive, liquid nails and such, don't give up easily. About the only approach I can suggest is to get started somewhere and work a thin putty knife in and try to cut the paneling loose. The end result may be you have to replace the drywall anyway, as there will still be lumps and bumps all over the place. A carefully adjusted circular saw could cut 99% of the way through, perhaps making it possible to remove a strip at a time.

Let's see if the pros have more ideas.
Bud
 
  #3  
Old 01-12-10, 01:09 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Little Rock Ar.
Posts: 292
Glue

Dont know if this would work for your situitation or not. Tell you what I did when removing my laminate Kitchen counter tops. They were the type that went all the way up to the bottom of the cabinets. Try using your clothes iron to heat up an area real good then pry up that area. The heat relaxes the glue and it may turn loose for you. It worked pretty good for me on the back splash. I still had some damage but not like you would if you just started just tearing it off. I didnt have to make any sheet rock repairs before I tiled it. Worth a try.
 
  #4  
Old 01-12-10, 02:44 PM
riggstad's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Philly Burbs
Posts: 174
The iron works on laminate works because it is most likely adhered together with contact cement. Your material is most likely adhered with construction adhesive (liquid nails).

Unfortunately, there is probably no way of getting it off without damaging the drywall.

But don't get too excited yet. Try pulling it off carefully with the suggestions from below. You might get lucky and do minimal damage to the drywall allowing you to just re float the wall with some compound, instead of having to replace it all.

Good Luck.
 
  #5  
Old 01-13-10, 06:09 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Little Rock Ar.
Posts: 292
Glue

Originally Posted by riggstad View Post
The iron works on laminate works because it is most likely adhered together with contact cement. Your material is most likely adhered with construction adhesive (liquid nails).

Unfortunately, there is probably no way of getting it off without damaging the drywall.

But don't get too excited yet. Try pulling it off carefully with the suggestions from below. You might get lucky and do minimal damage to the drywall allowing you to just re float the wall with some compound, instead of having to replace it all.

Good Luck.
Yep...If its on there with liquid nails...heating it up will not help. As Rig said... its worth a try, you might get lucky!! Is priming and painting the dining area totaly out of the question?
 
  #6  
Old 01-13-10, 06:29 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Rhode Island
Posts: 6
Thanks to all of you for your help! I'm afraid that painting is the solution at this time - I absolutely hate this room but perhaps I can "make it go away" by making it all one color as a short term fix. I can try a few of your tricks on the piece in the bedroom before I tackle the dining room.
Thanks again!!
pmk
 
  #7  
Old 01-13-10, 01:28 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 43,813
You might grow to like the wainscotting if you change the color. You might consider either the trim color [rest of the woodwork] or wall color. Either way it should be an enamel [any sheen]

To get a lasting paint job on paneling you need to scuff sand and use a solvent based primer. Latex would be fine for the top coat. Paneling usually takes 3 coats [1 primer, 2 finish paint]
 
  #8  
Old 01-15-10, 06:24 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: new york
Posts: 509
Why not leave it in place and cover it with 3/8 or 1/4" drywall. You would have to pull off the base board and any door trim but that's not as bad as living with something that you hate. Just add a chair rail to cover the top edge and route the door trim so that the dry wall fits behind it.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes